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  1. trueheart_205's Avatar
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    #1

    Please help me

    Could someone please explain clearly how to place an adverb in a sentence to express our opinion.
    Basicly, adverb is put after a verb. However, adverb is also placed at other positions such as: in the begining of a sentence, in front of a verb, after a verb and at the end of sentence.
    Let's take an example as follow. I changed the position of adverb "slowly" in each sentence.
    "Slowly, he drove to the house"
    "He slowly drove to the house"
    "He drove slowly to the house"
    "He drove to the house slowly"
    Which is correct and incorrect?
    Thanks in advance!

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    #2

    Re: Please help me

    Here's the horrifying fact: those are all perfect. Not a one of them commits a grammatical faux pas. What might make it easier to understand is knowing that an adverb can occur either before or after the verb which it modifies, and that you, in fact, have two adverbs in this sentence. The first (and one that you most easily recognize) is slowly. The other, and the one which is presently stymieing you is to the house. Technically, the prepositional phrase is identifying where he drove (an adverbial function), so what you have in these sentences are the following patterns (essentially):

    Adverb (set off with a comma because it is displaced)-- Subject -- Verb -- Adverb
    Subject -- Adverb -- Verb -- Adverb
    Subject -- Verb -- Adverb -- Adverb
    Subject -- Verb -- Adverb -- Adverb

    Because neither of the adverbs modifies the other (as far modifies away in the following sentence: He drove far away), it is possible to arrange them in whatever way is the most rhythmically pleasing and fits your purpose best, that is, however, another discussion altogether.

    I hope I was helpful.

    J. Jones
    Last edited by William Jones; 22-May-2012 at 06:18. Reason: I elected to leave out a word. Foolish me.

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    #3

    Re: Please help me

    Not a native or a professional teacher.

    There is not a strict rule for placing adverbs in sentences. So we couldn't generally say which place is the wrong one. However based on what I have learned from some references like Modern English we have some helpful guides to be conservative (not to choose a dubious place)

    Placing adverbs at the beginning or at the end of the sentence is usually possible.
    Beside verbs:
    If your sentence has some auxiliary verbs put the adverb after the first auxiliary verb.
    ex. I have recently seen John.
    If your sentence does not have an auxiliary verb then:
    a. If your main verb is 'be' place the adverb after 'be.'
    ex. He is usually at home at this time.
    b. If your main verb is not 'be' place the adverb before the main verb.
    ex. He usually works more than eight hours a day.
    Please remember these are not rules, but only mentioned for ease of use most of the time.
    Last edited by atabitaraf; 22-May-2012 at 07:26.

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    #4

    Re: Please help me

    Trueheart, any one of your quoted sentences would have been better as a thread title.

    Here's an extract from the forum guidelines:


    Post Titles
    Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed. (Avoid phrases like "HELP!", "Urgent!", "translation please", "how do I say this", "I'm new" and similar expressions.)

    Rover

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