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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    Bring On

    "bring on disaster" = cause disaster
    "bring on an apprentice" = cause an apprentice
    "bring on enemies" = cause enemies
    "bring on dessert" = cause desert

    Are these interpretations correct?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 29
    #2

    Re: Bring On

    "Bring on" can have these meanings:

    1. "to cause something to occur" (as in "Nikola Tesla's machine nearly brought on an earthquake"), and
    2. "to take on or accept" (as in "The Master was reluctant to bring on an apprentice of such advanced age"), and
    3. "to move from one location to another" (as in "The diners began to grow restless; one began chanting, 'Bring on dessert, bring on dessert!'").

    There are, I'm sure, other possible meaning for this verb/adverb pair.

    I hope that I was helpful.

    J. Jones

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