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  1. Member
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    #1

    Frisk

    I was frisked at the gate.

    The verb frisk is transitive. So the above is not correct. I don't know.

    It was a football match. The security staff looks for dangerous people

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Frisk

    Somebody frisked me - I was frisked.

    The verb 'frisk' is indeed transitive, and the passive form is fine.
    Last edited by 5jj; 23-May-2012 at 22:46.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Frisk

    As 5jj said, it's perfectly acceptable in both the active and passive. In the context you quoted (searching someone), what wouldn't be acceptable is "He frisked."

    "To frisk" has two meanings though, and the other meaning ("to move about briskly and playfully") is intransitive and "He frisked" would be fun in that context

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Frisk

    Whenever I am not slaving away here, I frisk, frolic and gambol with my girlfriends in the garden.

    In my dreams.

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    #5

    Re: Frisk

    Quote Originally Posted by Tina3 View Post
    I was frisked at the gate.

    The verb frisk is transitive. So the above is not correct. I don't know.

    It was a football match. The security staff looks for dangerous people
    The past participle "frisked" in your example is used as an adjective.

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    #6

    Re: Frisk

    "To frisk" has two meanings though, and the other meaning ("to move about briskly and playfully") is intransitive and "He frisked" would be fun in that context
    I did not know that. "Frolic" I know.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Frisk

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    The past participle "frisked" in your example is used as an adjective.
    It's the particple because it's passive. It's not an adjective. It's hard for me to think of a natural context for "frisked" as an adjective.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: Frisk

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's the particple because it's passive. It's not an adjective. It's hard for me to think of a natural context for "frisked" as an adjective.
    Excerpt from Hunter(College).cuny.edu and "my head" ():

    When the past participle (-ed, -en form) is used, the noun it describes is (or was)acted upon. For example, in "The child is frightened by the dog", the child is the receiver of the action and is described as a frightened child.

    • A past participle adjective:

    o indicates a past or completed action or time
    o is formed from a verbusing the perfect form and the passive voice
    o does not take an object
    o is often called the -ed form
    o often has the same form as the simple past of the verb

    • The chicken was eaten. The passenger (I) was frisked. In a more direct use of "frisked" as an adjective, "The frisked passengers were upset and considered it an invasion of their privacy".

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Frisk

    The Hunter (College).cuny.edu and your head are entitled to their opinions, but few writers this side of the pond would agree. In clear passive voice and perfect aspect constructions, most writers consider the third form/past participle of the verb to be just that, part of the verb:

    The dog has frightened the child.
    The child was frightened by the dog.


    When used immediately before a noun, such words are generally considered to be functioning as adjectives:

    The frightened child screamed.


    Following BE and other linking verbs, there is no general agreement, though if the third form is followed by 'by' it's generally considered to be part of the verb:

    I am frightened by dogs. Verb
    Don't go. I am frightened! ?adjective.
    Last edited by 5jj; 24-May-2012 at 17:57. Reason: typo

  7. CarloSsS's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Frisk

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    The Hunter (College).cuny.edu and your head are entitled to their opinions, but few writers ON this side of the pond would agree. .
    Is there a missing "on", or is it just a construction I don't know about yet?
    Please note that I'm not a teacher.

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