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    #1

    sentence

    Could anybody check it for me.

    I make tea for you.
    I make you tea.

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    #2

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by meela View Post
    Could anybody check it for me.

    I make tea for you.
    I make you tea.
    Both are fine structurally, and the first sentence is more natural.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: sentence

    I don't agree that the first is 'more natural' They are both fine.

    make you tea/tea for you? would have been a more helpful title for this thread, meela.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sentence

    They're both absolutely fine but I would say that such a statement in the present tense isn't likely to be heard very often. I would expect to say/hear:

    - Can I make tea for you?
    - Can I make you tea?
    - Shall I make tea for you?
    - Shall I make you tea?
    - I made tea for you.
    - I made you tea.
    - I will make tea for you.
    - I will make you tea.

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    #5

    Re: sentence

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Meela:

    As the other posters have told you, both are grammatically correct and both are used.

    I just wanted to let you know that some English learners get a big laugh when they hear a native speaker

    say, "She cooked her husband a delicious meal." "Did she cook her husband?" they ask.


    HAVE A NICE DAY!

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    #6

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Meela:

    As the other posters have told you, both are grammatically correct and both are used.

    I just wanted to let you know that some English learners get a big laugh when they hear a native speaker

    say, "She cooked her husband a delicious meal." "Did she cook her husband?" they ask.


    HAVE A NICE DAY!

    Hi TheParser,

    Why do they get a big laugh ? I don't understand.

    Thanks for help!

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Hi TheParser,

    Why do they get a big laugh ? I don't understand.

    Thanks for help!
    Because "She cooked her husband" without the rest of the sentence means that she put her husband in the oven and cooked him as if he were a piece of meat!

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    #8

    Re: sentence

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Because they hear the words "She cooked her husband." That is, she put her husband in a pot or the oven, and then she

    cooked him (just as she might cook a piece of meat or vegetables or anything else).

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    #9

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Because they hear the words "She cooked her husband." That is, she put her husband in a pot or the oven, and then she

    cooked him (just as she might cook a piece of meat or vegetables or anything else).
    Thanks TheParser and emsr2d2.

    Oh, they didn't used "cooked for".

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks TheParser and emsr2d2.

    Oh, they didn't used "cooked for".
    No. There are a couple of ways of saying the same thing:

    - She cooked a delicious meal for her husband. (Not amusing for learners)
    - She cooked her husband a delicious meal. (Amusing for some learners)

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