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  1. vectra's Avatar
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    #1

    I'd like to do absenteeism at least twice a month.

    Hello,

    This is a sentence from a student's homework assignment:
    'I'd like to do absenteeism at least twice a month.'

    I guess she overdid it, trying to use as many words and expressions we are styding in her example sentences.
    But what is the best way to say that a couple of times a month you do not feel like coming in to work?
    'I'd like not to turn up for work at least twice a month.' or 'I'd like to skip/miss work at least twice a month.'

    Thank you in advance.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I'd like to do absenteeism at least twice a month.

    You're right that hers is very unnatural. We simply don't "do absenteeism". I like your second suggestion.

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    #3

    Re: I'd like to do absenteeism at least twice a month.

    If she pretends to be ill to miss work, in BrE she could say that she throws/pulls a sickie twice a month.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I'd like to do absenteeism at least twice a month.

    Some people in BrE also adapt an old school phrase (to bunk off):

    I'd love to bunk off work a couple of times a month.
    I'd like to miss/skip work at least twice a month.

    What's not clear from the original post was whether or not she wanted to take days off at short-notice (probably phoning work in the morning and making up a story to explain why she couldn't come in) or if she just wished she had a couple of extra days' leave every month.

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    #5

    Re: I'd like to do absenteeism at least twice a month.

    There are lots of ways to put it naturally. However, it really depends on the context and more specicifically how polite you want to be. So if I'm talking to my university teacher, who is also sort of strict, I'd probably say: "I probably won't be able to make it to class two times next month", and would give a cast-iron excuse and ask what I could do to make up for it!

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