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    #1

    Post Wind At Front

    "He kicked the ball with the wind at his back"
    "He kicked the ball with the wind at his front"
    "He kicked the ball with the wind at his face"

    Would sentences 2 or 3 be the standard English opposite of sentence 1?

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    #2

    Re: Wind At Front

    "He kicked the ball with the wind at his back"
    "He kicked the ball with the wind at his front"
    "He kicked the ball with the wind at his face"

    Would sentences 2 or 3 be the standard English opposite of sentence 1?


    In a sports context the most natural phrase, in my experience, is: "He kicked the ball into the wind". Likewise, "In the second half our team will be playing into the wind". Also: "... playing against the wind".

    "He kicked the ball with the wind in his face" is the usual form for 3.

    not a teacher

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    #3

    Re: Wind At Front

    Thank you for your reply, JMurray!

    Making a few changes:

    "He stood outside with the wind at his back"
    "He stood outside with the wind at his front"
    "He stood outside with the wind at his face"

    Could sentences 2 & 3 be standard English opposites of sentence 1?

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    #4

    Re: Wind At Front

    "He stood outside with the wind at his back"
    "He stood outside with the wind at his front"
    "He stood outside with the wind at his face"

    Could sentences 2 & 3 be standard English opposites of sentence 1?


    No. The standard form is: "He stood outside with the wind in his face".
    Also: "He stood outside, facing (into) the wind".

    not a teacher

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    #5

    Re: Wind At Front

    I am closing this thread- the OP is a clone of a user who was banned for posting racist content and pornography on the site. If any accounts are banned in the next few days liker this, it is likely to be for the same reason.

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