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    #1

    having

    That is an old ancient record. It was discovered by a student of history at our institute.

    Are these two below the same as the combined version of the sentence above? Or do they mean something a bit different?

    That is an old ancient record having been discovered by a student of history at our institute.
    That is an old ancient record discovered by a student of history at our institute.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: having

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka View Post
    That is an old ancient record. It was discovered by a student of history at our institute.

    Are these two below the same as the combined version of the sentence above? Or do they mean something a bit different?

    That is an old ancient record having been discovered by a student of history at our institute.
    That is an old ancient record, discovered by a student of history at our institute.
    I'd write, "There is an ancient record which was discovered ..."
    Your first sentence is not right. You second could work, but I'd place a comma as I have above.

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    #3

    Re: having

    So is it impossible for a noun to be modified by 'having been -ed'?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: having

    No, it's not impossible in general. It doesn't work with a "There is..." sentence.

    The milk, havin been left out on the table overnight, was sour.

    The students, having been carted to every historic site the town had to offer, were ready for a break.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: having

    Wouldn't you come up with an example without a comma before 'having been -ed', Barb?

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    #6

    Re: having

    I can't think of a way to use it in a sentence without a comma.

    He is very tired, having been up all night working.
    The players, having been told that they were sure to win the game, were very surprised when they lost.
    Having been spoilt rotten since birth, it was very difficult for him to get used to being poor.

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    #7

    Re: having

    In my opinion, those are examples of reduced adverbial clauses (the first and the third one in particular).

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