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    #1

    for digging

    1-The soil is soft for digging.

    I think this sentence would normally mean:
    a-The soil is soft to dig.

    But could it also mean:
    b-The soil is soft because it has been dug.

    I think to express "b" one should use:
    2-The soil is soft for being dug.


    Gratefully,
    Navi.

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    #2

    Re: for digging

    I wouldn't- you could use for having been dug, but it's still an unnatural sentence for me.

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    #3

    Re: for digging

    Thanks a lot Tdol.

    I think I see what you mean.
    Would you say there is a difference between:
    A-He is angry for being wronged.
    and:
    B-He is angry for having been wronged.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

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    #4

    Re: for digging

    Less so with those examples, but none of them work very well for me- they're likely to be misconstrued by many people. However, again I would be more likely to use the having been wronged form if forced to use one.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: for digging

    I would say "He is angry at having been wronged" or "He is angry at her for having wronged him".

    As far as the first one is concerned, it really depends on what you mean. I don't think "The soil is soft for digging" means anything. You could use:

    The soil is soft enough to dig.
    The soil is soft enough for digging.
    The soil is too soft to dig.
    The soil is too soft for digging.
    The soil is now soft, having been dug.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: for digging

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Thanks a lot Tdol.

    I think I see what you mean.
    Would you say there is a difference between:
    A-He is angry for being wronged.
    and:
    B-He is angry for having been wronged.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.
    As Tdol said, those don't work. They are using (or trying to use) an old use of 'for', fossilized in the idiom 'can't see the wood for the trees'. (This idiom appears in a slightly different form in Can't see the forest for its trees - Idiom Definition - UsingEnglish.com, which I've never heard. I suspect the contributor speaks Am Ang - there are more forests than woods over there, and more woods than forests over here!)

    b

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