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  1. Tinkerbell's Avatar
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    #1

    nay, aye

    Which usage is correct? She finds out that he is an English and pleased with it and thought to herself:

    Nay, he is an English!

    Aye, he is an English.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: nay, aye

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinkerbell View Post
    Which usage is correct? She finds out that he is an English and pleased with it and thought to herself:

    Nay, he is an English!

    Aye, he is an English.
    Neither "Nay" nor "Aye" really makes sense, unless there is some other context we are missing which would explain why she was using rather outdated terms for "no" and "yes". We also don't say "an English". We say "He is English" or "He is an Englishman".

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    #3

    Re: nay, aye

    Why do you want to use nay/aye? They would both sound strange, and neither works here IMO.

  3. a_vee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: nay, aye

    Yeah, nay and aye are extremely outdated.
    If the girl is disagreeing with her previous opinion:

    No, he's English (or "an Englishman").

    If the girl is receiving confirmation of her previous opinion:

    Yes, he's English (or "an Englishman").

  4. Tinkerbell's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: nay, aye

    Sorry, I did a mistake. I'm asking for an exclamation refers to Wow, wonderful, moreover, furthermore.

  5. a_vee's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: nay, aye

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinkerbell View Post
    Sorry, I did a mistake. I'm asking for an exclamation refers to Wow, wonderful, moreover, furthermore.
    We make mistakes-you made a mistake.

    An exclamation that is similar to "wow" and rhymes with aye and nay is "yea". As an exclamation, this expression is quite informal. It is almost equal to "hooray", but I may be totally confused about what you are asking now.

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    #7

    Re: nay, aye

    In many BE dialects, 'aye (pronounced eye) and 'nay' – for yes and no – are alive and well.

    Compare the AE equivalents 'yeah' and 'nah'.

    Rover

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    #8

    Re: nay, aye

    Quote Originally Posted by a_vee View Post
    We make mistakes-you made a mistake.

    An exclamation that is similar to "wow" and rhymes with aye and nay is "yea". As an exclamation, this expression is quite informal. It is almost equal to "hooray", but I may be totally confused about what you are asking now.
    "Yea" is as outdated as "nay" when it means yes. Are you talking about "yay"? I think some people do use the spelling "yea" for "yay", but no dictionary I know does.

  6. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: nay, aye

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    In many BE dialects, 'aye (pronounced eye) and 'nay' – for yes and no – are alive and well.

    Compare the AE equivalents 'yeah' and 'nah'.

    Rover
    Hi Rover,

    I had only seen these expressions used in certain literary/poetic contexts, as well as in Parliamentary votes. I didn't think they were still in use anywhere else. But I was wrong, methinks

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: nay, aye

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    "Yea" is as outdated as "nay" when it means yes. Are you talking about "yay"? I think some people do use the spelling "yea" for "yay", but no dictionary I know does.
    This is just what I was thinking. I use "yay" as an alternative to "Hurrah!" It has become much more common in BrE in the last few years. I use it both in written and spoken English, though not in formal situations.

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