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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    fluid and ‘live

    What do you think this "live" means? The translation is "living, alive", but I'm not sure. Clothes are alive, that sounds weird.

    mo3-34
    ex)Ancient Greek and Roman costume is essentially draped,and presents a traditional stability and permanence. While it
    received certain fashions over the centuries, it never underwent any major transformation. Léon Heuzey, the pioneer of the study of classical costume, set forth with exemplary clarity its two basic principles: the first is that Classical costume has no form in itself, as it consisted of a simple rectangular piece of cloth woven in varying sizes according to its intended use and the height of the customer, without differentiation between the sexes; the second is that this cloth is always draped, never shaped or cut, and was worn round the body in accordance with definite rules. Thus it was always fluid and ‘live.’ It is notable that we find no evidence in Classical times of tailors or dressmakers: the word itself barely exists in Greek or Latin
    Last edited by keannu; 08-Jun-2012 at 14:19.

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    #2

    Re: fluid and ‘live

    I don't know. I don't speak "fashion."

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    #3

    Re: fluid and ‘live

    What do you think this "live" means? The translation is "living, alive", but I'm not sure. Clothes are alive, that sounds weird.

    Ancient Greek and Roman costume is essentially draped,and presents a traditional stability and permanence. While it
    received certain fashions over the centuries, it never underwent any major transformation. Léon Heuzey, the pioneer of the study of classical costume, set forth with exemplary clarity its two basic principles: the first is that Classical costume has no form in itself, as it consisted of a simple rectangular piece of cloth woven in varying sizes according to its intended use and the height of the customer, without differentiation between the sexes; the second is that this cloth is always draped, never shaped or cut, and was worn round the body in accordance with definite rules. Thus it was always fluid and ‘live.’ It is notable that we find no evidence in Classical times of tailors or dressmakers: the word itself barely exists in Greek or Latin.


    I feel a bit like SD, but I'll have a go.
    I think it says that because the fabric in a Classical garment was not shaped or tailored to fit the body closely, it was able to respond to the body's movement in a loose and fluid way that imbued the garment with a sense of life. I notice that the writer has put 'live' in quotes, perhaps to stop short of suggesting that it was actually "living" or "alive" as per the translation. Here, "live" may be close in meaning to "animated".

    not a teacher

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