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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    whose job it is ...

    Dear Sir / Madam:

    Is it correct to say "He is a school teacher whose job it is to give lectures in classroom." ? I would say .... whose job is to give lectures in classroom. But the radio and TV news have always inevitably added "it" between job and is. Please kindly advise me.

    Brgds
    yc li

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Welcome to the forum, yungchunli,

    The 'it' is fine, though not essential. but not much else is natural. Few teachers would describe their job as lecturing in the classroom; even if they did, 'the' is necessary. If you are saying what job a schoolteacher does, then we need a comma after 'schoolteacher'. If you are talking about one particular teacher whose job is to lecture rather than teach, then you could say:

    He is a schoolteacher whose job (it) is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.

    That sounds a little strange though - if his job is lecturing, then he is now a lecturer.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Sometimes we need "it" and sometimes we don't. Look at the following sentences:

    The man, whose house it is, is sitting over there.
    The man whose house is over there, is sitting over here.

    Edit: Apologies - I noticed later in the thread that someone had pointed out a missing comma in my post. I posted this from my phone where it's nigh on impossible to tell whether some punctuation marks have actually come out.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 18-Jun-2012 at 09:49. Reason: Missed comma.

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    #4

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The man whose house it is, is sitting over there.
    Hello, emsr2d2.
    This is an interesting construction I'm not used to.
    If I divide the sentence into two, could it be something like :

    The man is sitting over there.
    It is his house.

    Thank you in advance.

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    #5

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello, emsr2d2.
    This is an interesting construction I'm not used to.
    If I divide the sentence into two, could it be something like :

    The man is sitting over there.
    It is his house.

    Thank you in advance.
    Yes.

  6. Newbie
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    #6

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Dear Moderator:

    I still don't quite understand your explanantion. I am taught to say " He is a newspaper reporter whose job is to write about what is happening in the world." In fact my teacher will say it is grammatically wrong to say "whos job it is to write about ...".

    I did not mean "lecture" as in reprimand in my example sentence. I simply meant giving lessons in general.

    Brgds
    yc li

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    #7

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Quote Originally Posted by yungchunli View Post
    ...I did not mean "lecture" as in reprimand in my example sentence. I simply meant giving lessons in general.

    Brgds
    yc li
    No, it's not the 'reprimand' sort of 'lecture'. But giving lectures is not typically what a schoolteacher does (if s/he's any good at his/her job). A lecturer lectures and a teacher teaches. If your man is a teacher his job is to teach (not to lecture).

    b

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    #8

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Quote Originally Posted by yungchunli View Post
    Dear Moderator:

    I still don't quite understand your explanantion. I am taught to say " He is a newspaper reporter whose job is to write about what is happening in the world." In fact my teacher will say it is grammatically wrong to say "whose job it is to write about ...".

    yc li
    Hello.
    Well, how about this:

    1. He is a schoolteacher. His job is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.
    He is a schoolteacher whose job is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.

    2. He is a schoolteacher. It is his job to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.
    He is a schoolteacher whose job it is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.

    Are #1 and #2 convincing to you? I hope you'll understand what I mean.

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    #9

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello.
    Well, how about this:

    1. He is a schoolteacher. His job is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.
    He is a schoolteacher whose job is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.

    2. He is a schoolteacher. It is his job to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.
    He is a schoolteacher whose job it is to lecture in classrooms/the classroom.

    Are #1 and #2 convincing to you? I hope you'll understand what I mean.
    I understand "whose job it" as parallel subjects (of a clause). I'm sure I've got it.


    And, the structure of the emsr2d2's example "The man whose house it is, is sitting over there" reminds me that OP's sentence "He is a school teacher whose job it is to give lectures in classroom" is equal to "He is a school teacher whose job it is, is to give lectures in classroom." Am I on the right track?

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    #10

    Re: whose job it is ...

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    And, the structure of the emsr2d2's example "The man whose house it is, is sitting over there" reminds me that OP's sentence "He is a school teacher whose job it is to give lectures in classroom" is equal to "He is a school teacher whose job it is, is to give lectures in classroom." Am I on the right track?
    I feel that the comma in ems's sentences is a mistake:
    The man whose house it is, is sitting over there.
    The man whose house is over there, is sitting over here..
    We cannot separate a subject from its verb by one comma. We can use two commas for a non-defining relative clause functioning parenthetically within a main clause, or one comma to separate the non-defining relative clause from the main clause:

    That man, whose house this is, is drinking rather a lot.
    I am impressed by the interior design ideas of that man, whose house this is.

    So, "He is a school teacher whose job it is, is to give lectures in classroom" is incorrect. The two sentences below are correct:

    He is a schoolteacher whose job it is to teach infants. (As opposed to one whise job it is to teach teenagers.)
    He is a school teacher, whose job it is to teach infants. (I am telling you a little more about his job.

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