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  1. BrunaBC's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
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      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 248
    #1

    well - better

    Hi,

    It just ocurred to me: 'good' is an adjective, 'well' is an adverb. The comparative form of good is 'better', so please consider the sentences below:

    1) Mary cooks very well. (ok)
    2) Sue doesn't cook well. (ok)
    3) Mary cooks better than Sue. (is this structure possible?)

    Thank you!
    Not a teacher.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,609
    #2

    Re: well - better

    Quote Originally Posted by BrunaBC View Post
    Hi,

    It just ocurred to me: 'good' is an adjective, 'well' is an adverb. The comparative form of good is 'better', so please consider the sentences below:

    1) Mary cooks very well. (ok)
    2) Sue doesn't cook well. (ok)
    3) Mary cooks better than Sue. (is this structure possible?)

    Thank you!
    Yes. "well" is also an adjective.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3

    Re: well - better

    Well can indeed also function as an adjective, but in 'Mary cooks well' it is functioning as an adverb.

    Better is the comparative form of both good (adjective) and well (adverb and adjective).

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