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      • Native Language:
      • German
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      • Germany
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    #1

    Good mood?

    Sir,
    When asked to write invitations to a birthday party in English, a number of my Year 5 students chose the expression "Bring good mood with you". This is quite common in German but sounds very un-English to me. Am I right?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Good mood?

    That's very unnatural in English. We might use "Be ready to have a great time!" or something similar.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Good mood?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hever View Post


    Sir,


    A number of teachers here are female, Hever—including emsr2d2.

    No salutation is necessary.

    Rover

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: Good mood?

    So am I - female, I mean. Sorry, emsr2d2, and thank you very much for your quick answer.

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    #5

    Re: Good mood?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    A number of teachers here are female, Hever—including emsr2d2.

    No salutation is necessary.

    Rover

    I haven't understood it very well. Can't "Sir" also be used to name a female when she's greatly esteemed by Public? In China, a famous female writer can be called as "Xiansheng" (先生,the equivalent of English "Sir", though the title 先生 is usually used to address an adult male respectfully ) as well.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Good mood?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    I haven't understood it very well. Can't "Sir" also be used to name a female when she's greatly esteemed by Public?
    No. Never.

    Note that the equivalent of the knighthood title of 'Sir' for a male is 'Dame' for a female: Sir Sean Connery; Dame Vera Lynn.

    Those shop assistants who still address male customers as 'sir', address female customers as 'madam'. In the services, superiors are addressed as 'sir' and 'ma'am' (to rhyme with 'jam').
    Last edited by 5jj; 18-Jun-2012 at 08:57.

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