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    #1

    "On" or "In"?

    "On [Istanbul's] Cukurcuma Street, I passed a ...."

    I have just read this in a very literate British magazine.

    1. Does this mean that some Brits are adopting the American practice of using the preposition "on" + street name?

    2. Is it more likely that the magazine simply decided to let stand the author's use of an Americanism?

    THANK YOU

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    #2

    Re: "On" or "In"?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    "On [Istanbul's] Cukurcuma Street, I passed a ...."

    I have just read this in a very literate British magazine.

    1. Does this mean that some Brits are adopting the American practice of using the preposition "on" + street name?

    2. Is it more likely that the magazine simply decided to let stand the author's use of an Americanism?

    THANK YOU
    If the person who wrote the piece used "on" then the magazine will have left it as "on". Just because it's a British magazine, that doesn't mean every word you read in it will be standard British usage. They probably accept submissions of writing from all over the world so as long as it's grammatically correct, it won't be changed.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: "On" or "In"?

    Thank you for your reply.

    So I assume that all Brits still would use "in" in that sentence.


    *****

    I have read that many Brits now say "It is the first time that it has happened in three years" instead of the usual British use of for.

    So I was hoping that some Brits were starting to follow American English by saying "On Maple St.," but apparently that is not yet the case.

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