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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    This sentence structure is weird. Which is the subject for "engaged in" and "spent"? For "spent", both "Students" or "class" seems to be, and for "engaged in", either seems to be, confusing me.

    go3mo-41
    ex) A study found that enrollment in physical education classes was not related to academic achievement scores, but involvement in vigorous physical activity was. Students who engaged in vigorous activity outside of school at least 20 minutes per day, three days per week, were found to have higher academic scores. Students in the physical education class spent an average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute class engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.
    Last edited by keannu; 19-Jun-2012 at 09:23.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    This sentence structure is weird. Which is the subject for "engaged in" and "spent"? For "spent", both "Students" or "class" seems to be, and for "engaged in", either seems to be, confusing me.

    go3mo-41
    ex) A study found that enrollment in physical education classes was not related to academic achievement scores, but involvement in vigorous physical activity was. Students who engaged in vigorous activity outside of school at least 20 minutes per day, three days per week, were found to have higher academic scores.
    Students in the physical education class spent an average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute class engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.
    The subject of 'engaged in' is 'who', the antecedent of which is 'students'. The subject of 'spent' is 'Students', specifically those students in the physical education class.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    Sorry, sometimes tool modules don't work here, so I couldn't underline the things. I meant the second "engaged in" and typing it, I realized its subject is "students", but I wondered why there is no comma and what the difference is between a comma ", engaged" and no comma.

    ex)...Students in the physical education class spent an average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute class engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    The comma would be incorrect.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Sorry, sometimes tool modules don't work here, so I couldn't underline the things. I meant the second "engaged in" and typing it, I realized its subject is "students", but I wondered why there is no comma and what the difference is between a comma ", engaged" and no comma.

    ex)...Students in the physical education class spent an average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute class engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.
    There would be no reason to put a comma there. If you remove the extraneous information "out of a 55-minute class" from the sentence, then you are left with:

    Students ... spent an average of only 19 minutes engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity.

    Would you put a comma in that sentence?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    I thought "engaged in" describes "students", but from what you said, it does "a 55-minute class". If "engaged in" describes "students", it can also describe with a comma meaning a simultaneous action like 1. Doesn't 1 work, either? Maybe I have a wrong understanding about participial phrases.

    1.I stayed home, playing computer games.
    2. Students spent an average of only 19 minutes, engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity.
    Last edited by keannu; 19-Jun-2012 at 11:28.

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I thought "engaged in" describes "students", but from what you said, it does "a 55-minute class".
    No. Look at post #5 more carefully.

  8. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    It does not "describe" the students. It is the main verb.

    Studets engaged in exercise for only 19 minutes.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  9. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It does not "describe" the students. It is the main verb.

    Studets engaged in exercise for only 19 minutes.
    I don't agree. The main verb is 'spent' in "Students in the physical education class spent an average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute class engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity".

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: engaged in moderate-to-vigorous

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I don't agree. The main verb is 'spent' in "Students in the physical education class spent an average of only 19 minutes out of a 55-minute class engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity".
    I agree that the main verb is "spent". They spent the time doing that activity. "Engaged in" simply means "doing".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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