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  1. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #1

    come over / come

    A mysterious, terrible change had come over the elephant.
    The phrase "come over' put in bold, does it mean the same as "come"? Or, is there any difference in the sentence if "over" is deleted?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    A mysterious, terrible change had come over the elephant.
    The phrase "come over' put in bold, does it mean the same as "come"? Or, is there any difference in the sentence if "over" is deleted?
    Do you think "A mysterious, terrible change had come the elephant" makes sense? If so, what do you think it means?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. BrunaBC's Avatar
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    #3
    Not a teacher.

  4. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    A mysterious, terrible change had come over the elephant.
    The phrase "come over' put in bold, does it mean the same as "come"? Or, is there any difference in the sentence if "over" is deleted?
    NOT A TEACHER

    I recommend that you look up "come over" in a good dictionary. For example, take a look at this entry from the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.

    come over phrasal verb
    1 a) if someone comes over, they visit you at your house : Do you want to come over on Friday evening?

    b) if someone comes over, they come to the country where you are come over to/from When did your family first come over to America?



    2 come over somebody if a strong feeling comes over you, you suddenly experience it : A wave of sleepiness came over me.
    I’m sorry about that – I don’t know what came over me (= I do not know why I behaved in that way ) .

    3 if an idea comes over well, people can understand it easily : I thought that the points he was making came over quite clearly.

    4 if someone comes over in a particular way, they seem to have particular qualities SYN come across : He didn’t come over very well (= seem to have good qualities ) in the interview.
    come over as She comes over as a very efficient businesswoman.


    No, you cannot replace "come over" with "come", because that wouldn't make any sense.

  5. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Do you think "A mysterious, terrible change had come the elephant" makes sense? If so, what do you think it means?
    Hello emsr2d2. I think I've just caught the mistake. The original sentence will be the as same as "A mysterious, terrible change had come to the elephant", I suppose.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    Hello emsr2d2. I think I've just caught the mistake. The original sentence will be the as same as "A mysterious, terrible change had come to the elephant", I suppose.
    No.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: come over / come

    No. There is no error in the original sentence. Did you look up those definitions of "to come over"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    No.
    Then, Maybe "A mysterious, terrible change had affected elephant"?, I suppose by guessing from the definition below....

    come over somebody

    [no passive]to affect somebodyA fit of dizziness came over her.I can't think what came over me (= I do not know what caused me to behave in that way).

  9. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. There is no error in the original sentence. Did you look up those definitions of "to come over"?
    Yes. there was several definitions of "come over"

  10. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: come over / come

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    Yes. there were several definitions of "come over"
    Were there? Well, that's usual, now you have to find the one that comes closest to your perceived meaning.

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