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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    get down and do sth

    Hello.

    I have this sentence, 'But as usual, I was running against the clock, trying to get down and catch the train on time'.
    I have looked for the meanings of the phrase across different dictionaries but didn't get an answer.
    Could you please make it plain for me.

    Thanks, Alex.

  2. BrunaBC's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: get down and do sth

    Hi Alex,

    This is a very common expression. Take a look at the OALD definition: get down to something

    to begin to do something; to give serious attention to something.
    Not a teacher.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: get down and do sth

    Quote Originally Posted by BrunaBC View Post
    Take a look at the OALD definition: get down to something
    'Get down and ...' is a different expression from 'get down to ...", Bruna.

    I don't know what is meant there, Alex; it sounds starnge to me.

  4. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: get down and do sth

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    'Get down and ...' is a different expression from 'get down to ...", Bruna.

    I don't know what is meant there, Alex; it sounds starnge to me.
    Maybe it means this?

    get down 1. Sl. to lay one’s money on the table. (Gambling.)
    Okay, everybody get down. Get down, and let’s
    get going! 2. Sl. to concentrate; to do something well.
    I’m flunking two subjects, man. I gotta get down. Come
    on, Sam, pay attention. Get down and learn this stuff.
    3. Sl.
    to copulate. Hey, let’s get down! All Steve wants to do
    is get down all the time.
    Source: MCGraw-Hill's Osborne Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

    It's really hard to tell. The context isn't very specific.

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    #5

    Re: get down and do sth

    Maybe he lives in a tall apartment building and waiting for the elevator can add some time to his trip.

    Maybe the train station is in an area of the town that he considers a "down" travel from where he is. So he has to "go down" to the station to catch the train.

    Consider that people go "down town" enough that city centers are called "downtown." Even if the city center is geographically elevated compared to the surroundings. It's an expression.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: get down and do sth

    Maybe they just meant "get down [to the train station] and catch the train". I know a lot of people who say things like "Last night I got down the pub and found loads of my friends there" or "If I get up to London this weekend, I'll go and visit my cousin".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: get down and do sth

    Thanks very much for your answers.
    It seems to me that the ScoothingDave's and emsr2ds's answers are most suitable, in the sense of going down.
    So if it was said 'go down and catch the train ...' that would make sense, right?
    Does 'go down' mean 'go south"? Or can we say 'go down' even if we go north?

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    #8

    Re: get down and do sth

    It's not related to compass directions. If anything, it has to do with topography.

    In most cases someone telling you "go up the street and make the second left" and "go down the street and make the second left" are telling you the same thing.

    Now, of course, if the street went up a hill, it would not be normal to say "go down" the street.

  7. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: get down and do sth

    The first thought visited me after reading the last Dave's post was "It must be that people who say 'go up' are optimists while ones saying 'go down' are pessimists"

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: get down and do sth

    For longer distances, I follow the compass point theory. I live on the South coast of England so to me, unless I'm going east or west, everything is "up". I go up to London, up to Gatwick Airport, up to Scotland, up to Manchester etc etc. If I go east, it's in an almost straight line along the coast, so I go along to Dover. If I go west as far as probably Southampton, I would go along - along to Portsmouth, along to Southampton. Any further than that (into the counties of Dorset, Devon or Cornwall) then not only is it further but (in my head!) the coastline starts to slope downwards so I go down to Devon, go down to Cornwall etc.

    My flatmate is originally from the Midlands (around Birmingham). When he lived there, he would go down to London but up to Scotland.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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