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  1. keannu's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Korean
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      • South Korea
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      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
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    #1

    followed by the silence of the night

    This is what confuses me all the time. I don't know if this kind of analysis by Koreans(not me) is correct.
    This(followed by = which were followed) makes me think it's a short form of an unrestrictive clause and the subject is not "the wheels" but "the hall", but I think it's a participial phrase to mean a consecutive or simultaneous action whose subject is "the wheels".
    So it should be corrected to "and(or while) it was followed"(conjuction+subject+verb) not "which+verb". shouldn't it?

    go1-4-7p
    ex) When the attendants came, I looked out through the bars of the bed. I still remember the sound of the wheels (which were) rolling down the hall, followed by the silence of the night.
    = which were followed

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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      • British English
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      • England
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    #2

    Re: followed by the silence of the night

    Nothing need 'correcting'. the sentence is fine as it is. Your 'corrections' make the sentence sound less natural.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: followed by the silence of the night

    Okay, but I learned both "unrestritive clause(which(who)+verb)" and "participial phrase(conjunction+subject+verb), so I don't know which one to apply to such cases. Do I only have to understand such phrases as they are without any analysis?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: followed by the silence of the night

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Do I only have to understand such phrases as they are without any analysis?
    That seems like a good idea to me.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: followed by the silence of the night

    I 'liked ' bhai's last post because it is my own reaction to many of your (keannu's) questions.

    If we wish to be able to teach English, then we need to be able to analyse utterances so that we can present/explain them meaningfully to learners. I have no problems with that - on the contarary, I feel that teachers should be able to analyse constructions to some degree.

    What I do have problems with (and I have mentioned this before, keannu) is the inistence of some people on slotting every utterance ever uttered ino a limited number of labelled categories and/or re-phrasing them to show that they 'must' be in 'this category'.

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