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  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #1

    all the + comparative

    Hello.
    I asked this question in another thread, but it was irrelevant to the original question.
    So, I'd like to ask this question here.

    I've seen example sentences like these in my grammar book written by a Japanese:

    1. 'Jeremy's friends like him all the more/better for his generosity.'
    or
    2. 'Jeremy's friends like him all the more/better because he is generous.'

    I've got Practical English Usage (Third Edition, Michael Swan), but I cannot find any example sentences using "like...all the more/better for..."

    Are #1 and #2 acceptable?

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    #2

    Re: all the + comparative

    I would use "more" in those sentences.

    And it's a "Japanese person/man/woman" not "a Japanese." "Japanese" is an adjective.

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    #3

    Re: all the + comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I would use "more" in those sentences.

    And it's a "Japanese person/man/woman" not "a Japanese." "Japanese" is an adjective.
    Not a teacher

    Does 'the Japanese' mean 'Japanese people'?

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    #4

    Re: all the + comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Not a teacher

    Does 'the Japanese' mean 'Japanese people'?
    Yes, it can. In a sentence like "The Japanese are an industrious people."

    But you can't call a specific individual "a Japanese" or "a Chinese" or "an English."

    Certain nationality words can be used as adjectives or nouns and others can't.

    American, Canadian, Australian, German - can be used like this: He is a German. He is German. I am an American. I am American.

    Others don't work that way. "She is Japanese," but not "she is a Japanese." He is an Englishman. He is English.

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