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    #1

    they are by any other name...

    Hello everyone!
    The TV series Great Planes used in an epigraph the following:

    "Throughout the history of aviation, only a few aircraft have excelled to become legend.
    They are by any other name..."

    What does it mean, "They are by any other name"?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: they are by any other name...

    It would help if you gave the complete sentence.

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    #3

    Re: they are by any other name...

    No other input...
    It's an epigraph that goes at the beginning of each episode in the series.
    It's a black screen, then letters are typed line by line.
    Then, after the black screen with letters, a frame is going with the inscription "GREAT PLANES". Thereupon, an image is shown of a plane that is going to be described in the episode and its name, e.g.
    Republic
    P-47 Thunderbolt
    Have a look:
    Discovery Channel Great Planes Republic P 47 Thunderbolt - YouTube
    Last edited by Jack8rkin; 22-Jun-2012 at 14:33.

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    #4

    Re: they are by any other name...

    Disclaimer: I am not an English teacher.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8rkin View Post
    The TV series Great Planes used in an epigraph the following:

    "Throughout the history of aviation, only a few aircraft have excelled to become legend.
    They are by any other name..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8rkin View Post
    Then, after the black screen with letters, a frame is going with the inscription "GREAT PLANES".
    You need to read the two parts as a whole:

    "Throughout the history of aviation, only a few aircraft have excelled to become legend. They are by any other name GREAT PLANES."



    (I THINK - repeat: THINK - the following punctuation is also possible: "They are, by any other name, GREAT PLANES.")


    Do you understand it now?
    Dear native English speakers of this forum,
    Please, always point out my grammatical mistakes, assuming you have "the time and the inclination". That is really the most effective way for me to improve. Thank you very much.

    Please note that I am NOT an English teacher.

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    #5

    Re: they are by any other name...

    Do you?
    This phrase is full of confusion to me.
    Does the above phrase mean: "their name is great planes"?
    Why was such a form selected?
    Is it a stylistic trick?
    If so, what exactly is the purpose of using it?
    What did the author mean by using this strange form instead of, let's say: "everybody knows them as the Great Planes"?
    or "they are known as the Great Planes"?
    Native speakers, help!
    Last edited by Jack8rkin; 22-Jun-2012 at 14:35.

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    #6

    Re: they are by any other name...

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    It would help if you gave the complete sentence.
    I wish I could! See my later comments, please.

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    #7

    Re: they are by any other name...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack8rkin View Post
    Do you?
    This phrase is full of confusion to me.
    Does the above phrase mean: "their name is great planes"? They are considered great/outstanding planes, not just average planes
    Why such a form was selected.
    Is it a stylistic trick? Yes
    If so, what exactly is the purpose of using it?
    What did the author mean by using this strange form instead of, let's say: "everybody knows them as the Great Planes"?
    or "they are known as the Great Planes"? That's what stylistic figures are for: to create, for example, expectations in the audience.
    Native speakers, help!
    Greetings,

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: they are by any other name...

    It probably comes from 'A rose by any other name would smell as sweet'. Shakespeare meant by this that, no matter what name we might happen to give to the flower that we now call a rose, it would still smell exactly as sweet as it does with the name 'rose'. It's rather clumsily used in this series. It is supposed to mean that, no matter what you call them, they will alway be great planes.

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    #9

    Re: they are by any other name...

    Ok. So it comes back to Shakespeare!
    It was more or less clear to me that the author wanted to put an emphasis on the name.
    I expected a trick here but could not connect the form to anything.
    Thanks for help!
    Now it's much clearer.
    And I agree that this phrase sounds a bit clumsy here.

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