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  1. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #1

    you'd&you would three 'd

    Hello.
    I'm quite suspicious about whether or not you'd mean you would in the below because of repeated 'd. I'm thinking there's possibility of 'd is used abbreviation for had.
    Does you'd mean you would in the following sentences?
    You'd be a little worried, wouldn't you? You'd feel that you had a hot potato in your hand, and you'd want to drop it

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: you'd&you would three 'd

    It means "you would" in each case.

    It could not mean "you had" for two reasons:

    1) It doesn't fit the context;
    2) "You had be a little worried", "You had feel that ..." and "You had want to drop it" are all incorrect English.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: you'd&you would three 'd

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It means "you would" in each case.

    It could not mean "you had" for two reasons:

    1) It doesn't fit the context;
    2) "You had be a little worried", "You had feel that ..." and "You had want to drop it" are all incorrect English.
    Thank you emsr2d2.
    Is it okay to understand had can't be used as grammatical such as I had=I'd, You had=you'd like you mentioned?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: you'd&you would three 'd

    We regularly use apostrophe+d to replace "had" but it wasn't appropriate in your examples.

    You'd better practice the piano = You had better practice the piano.
    He'd been in the sea for three hours = He had been in the sea for three hours.
    They'd seen the film before = They had seen the film before.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: you'd&you would three 'd

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It means "you would" in each case.

    It could not mean "you had" for two reasons:

    1) It doesn't fit the context;
    2) "You had be a little worried", "You had feel that ..." and "You had want to drop it" are all incorrect English.
    3) The question tag of "
    You
    'd be a little worried, wouldn't you?"
    only makes sense if "You'd" means "You would".

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