Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. sherishine's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 79
    #1

    Question What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    I searched the phrase" inky-dinky parlez-vous", and thought it might be related to an old song popular several decades ago.

    The name of the song is Mademoiselle from Armentieres.

    However I still have no clue for the meaning of "inky-dinky parlez-vous".

    Do you know anything about this phrase?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,902
    #2

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    I don't think it has that specific a meaning. It's meant to sound a bit naughty- there are mild sexual connotations in the song, so it adds to that without being specific or rude,

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    I suppose it could be an attempt to describe the way you feel if you haven't been kissed for forty years.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #4

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I suppose it could be an attempt to describe the way you feel if you haven't been kissed for forty years.
    (but 'forty' )You feel 'hunky-dory', but there may also be an admixture of Tdol's 'hanky-panky'!

    Bear in mind that nonsense syllables are often used - 'fa-a-la', 'hey nonny no', etc. Also, sherishine, remember that it was a First World War song sung by English soldiers. 'Mademoiselle' has four syllables, to match the tune, and the place-name is pronounced /'a:məntiəz/.

    b

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,846
    #5

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    In current BrE, "dinky" means something approximating "small and cute".

    The nursery rhyme I was taught starts "Itsy-bitsy spider climbed up the spout...". In a British children's TV show in the late 70s, the name of which escapes me, there were two puppet spiders, one called Itsy and the other called Bitsy.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #6

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    I know it as the itsy-bitsy spider too.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #7

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    I grew up with the incey-wincey spider.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,846
    #8

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I grew up with the incey-wincey spider.
    Without wishing to sound like a 14-year-old girl - OMG!!!! I learnt that version too and had completely forgotten about it in the mists of time. I think I now associate it so much with the puppet spiders on Paperplay that I only remembered that version. Now the question is, of course, what on earth does "incey-wincey" mean?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #9

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I grew up with the incey-wincey spider.
    Me too. (Wonder what 'coeval' means... )

    b

  9. sherishine's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2010
    • Posts: 79
    #10

    Re: What does "Inky-dinky" mean?

    Incey-wincey parlez-vous May it be better than the inky-dinky( this word reminds me of something lovely yet dark ) version for me.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Jun-2012, 17:55
  2. Defining "Street," "Road," "Avenue," "Boulevard"
    By ahumphreys in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2010, 08:14
  3. [Vocabulary] How do you pronounce "Cotton", "Button", "Britain", "Manhattan"...
    By Williamyh in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2009, 09:36
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 08:27
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •