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    #1

    expression of politeness (let someone enter first)

    Dear native speakers,

    I would like to know what polite expressions English use when one wishes to let someone enter somewhere first (let's fancy that two persons are arriving at the same time at the same place and can't enter together)?

    Can I say "please go first" (that sounds unnatural to me) or just "please (go ahead)" or just "please" with a gesture or "after you" or something different?

    Thank you

    Guillaume

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    #2

    Re: expression of politeness (let someone enter first)

    I use, 'After you' or 'You first'. If I think that the other person has a right or duty to go first, I may say, "You go first". Often, informally, I take half a step back and/or indicate with a slight movement of the head and a small gesture with the appropriate arm that the other person should go ahead of me. If I am with a modern-minded female friend, I may say 'Ladies first", just to see the expression on her face.

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    #3

    Re: expression of politeness (let someone enter first)

    "After you" is what I would say.

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    #4

    Re: expression of politeness (let someone enter first)

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "After you" is what I would say.
    Me, too.

    I read it in this book—'Polite Expressions' by Hugo Furst.

    Rover

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