Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,330
    #1

    0.2 litre or 0.2 litres

    Using vaccuum suction technology, flushing liquids takes only 0.2 litre / litres of water while flushing solids requires only one litre.

    The above sentence is from a local paper.

    I remember reading that anything less than one should be followed by a plural noun, so I think '0.2 litres' should have been used instead.

    Thanks.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,451
    #2

    Re: 0.2 litre or 0.2 litres

    I agree with you in that context.

    Alternatively you could say '. . . takes only one fifth of a litre.'

    Rover

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,330
    #3

    Re: 0.2 litre or 0.2 litres

    Thanks, Rover.

    It just dawns on me that 0.2 litres doesn't make sense since it is less that 1 litre; 2, 3, 4, etc litres make sense.

    Could you please explain the reason for the usage? Thanks.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,451
    #4

    Re: 0.2 litre or 0.2 litres

    Whether it makes sense or not, that's the standard usage for any weight or measure.

    Only a whole unit takes the singular word:

    0.5 miles, 1 mile, 1.001 miles etc.

    Rover

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •