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    #1

    Past Perfect

    Hi everyone!

    I would like to ask your help. I'm practising Past Perfect Tense at the moment. When I learn tenses, I usually search examples for each types of sentences. Well, the declarer sentence in this case is "I couldn't buy anything because I had lost my wallet."
    My question would be : what is the question form of this sentence? As I think the sentence "You couldn't buy anything because you had lost your wallet?" is not correct at all.

    Thanks for your help in advance.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Past Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by suzie0726 View Post
    Hi everyone!

    I would like to ask your help. I'm practising Past Perfect Tense at the moment. When I learn tenses, I usually search examples for each types of sentences. Well, the declarer sentence in this case is "I couldn't buy anything because I had lost my wallet."
    My question would be : what is the question form of this sentence? As I think the sentence "You couldn't buy anything because you had lost your wallet?" is not correct at all.

    Thanks for your help in advance.
    The inversion "rule" for the interrogative follows with this sentence:

    Couldn't you buy anything because you had lost your wallet?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Past Perfect

    It depends on what question you want to ask:
    What was the consequence of losing your wallet?
    Why couldn't you buy anything?
    So, you couldn't buy anything because you lost your wallet, right?

    In fact, we do form questions exactly as you indicated with an upward inflection at the end, usually when you want confirmation that you understood correctly. "I'm not going to Paris after all." "What? You're not going to Paris after all?"
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Past Perfect

    It's probably not the most natural question as part of a conversation. I would expect to hear something like:

    - I lost my wallet yesterday.
    - Oh no! What happened?
    - Well, for a start I couldn't buy anything!

    or

    - I lost my wallet yesterday while I was out shopping.
    - Oh no! Could you not buy anything?
    - No, nothing at all. I had to just go home.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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