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    #1

    should

    Is it possible for 'It shouldn't be raining there' to mean 'I don't think it's possible that it is raining there'?

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    #2

    Re: should

    Yes. In the context with rain, that's the most likely interpretation.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: should

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka View Post
    Is it possible for 'It shouldn't be raining there' to mean 'I don't think it's possible that it is raining there'?
    I think it's more likely to mean "Brilliant sunshine was forecast for that place, so I am surprised that it is raining. This goes against all expectations".

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    #4

    Re: should

    Against all expectations! That's a great explanation.

    So it's not just about guessing the possibility of raining, right?

    And what do you think is the difference between 'It shouldn't be raining there' and 'It can't be raining there'?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: should

    'It shouldn't be raining there' - It is apparently raining there, against all expectations.
    'It can't be raining there' - All the evidence available suggests strongly that it is not raining there. If it is in fact raining there, then I am very surprised, because it shouldn't be.
    Last edited by 5jj; 28-Jun-2012 at 19:28. Reason: typo

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    #6

    Re: should

    I think "against all my expectations it's raining there" is a little too emphatic a sense to jump out of something so mild as "it shouldn't be raining there" without further context. British understatement, perhaps?

    Coming across that sentence by itself, I would interpret it simply as "I don't expect it to be raining there".

    Now, "It shouldn't be raining here" does convey the contradiction of expectations, strongly, and all by itself. Why the difference? We know what is here, but do not necessarily know what is there. We need context to understand that we are in fact aware of the weather over there.

    PS. In speech, even intonation and the facial expression can provide the necessary context.
    Last edited by abaka; 02-Jul-2012 at 19:54.

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