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  1. azhu's Avatar
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    #1

    Wink Would/will?

    This is the original sentence: Ms. Adams just asked Ms. Chang: "Will you be in class tomorrow?"
    If I'm to write this sentence without quotation marks, then which sentence I wrote down below is right? Why?
    1. Ms. Adams wanted to know if Ms. Chang would be in class tomorrow.
    2. Ms. Adams wanted to know if Ms. Chang will be in class tomorrow.


    Thank you

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Would/will?

    There is no full stop (period) after 'Ms' in British English. It's not an abbreviation.

    Both are possible if the sentence is written on the day Ms Adams asked the question. If written the following day, it can be either of these two:

    3. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang would be in class today.
    4. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang will be in class today.

    If written after that, it becomes:

    5. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang would be in class the next/following day.
    Last edited by 5jj; 01-Jul-2012 at 14:44. Reason: 'in British English' added

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Would/will?

    Ms. takes the period in the U.S. It corresponds to Mrs. and Mr. as a style thing.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. azhu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Would/will?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    There is no full stop (period) after 'Ms' in British English. It's not an abbreviation.

    Both are possible if the sentence is written on the day Ms Adams asked the question. If written the following day, it can be either of these two:

    3. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang would be in class today.
    4. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang will be in class today.

    If written after that, it becomes:

    5. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang would be in class the next/following day.
    Thank you very much.^_^

    So, if the sentence is written on the same day Ms Adams asked the question, (3)and (4) are both OK, no difference; but if it's some time after that day, only (5) will do, right?

    Just to make sure I'm understanding everything right.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Would/will?

    More specifically, as long as it is said BEFORE class. It wouldn't work at 11 p.m. that night, after class, even though it was the same say. Otherewise, yes.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Would/will?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    There is no full stop (period) after 'Ms' in British English. It's not an abbreviation.

    Both are possible if the sentence is written on the day Ms Adams asked the question.
    But, as 5jj well knows, they mean different things....

    5. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang would be in class the next/following day.
    Note the change from 'tomorrow' to 'the next/the following day'. '1. Ms. Adams wanted to know if Ms. Chang would be in class tomorrow' works without this change only if the word 'tomorrow' still actually refers to the following day - that is, if the original conversation and the report are separated by no more than a few hours: 'Mrs B. rang while you were out. She wanted to know in you could stand in for her tomorrow.'

    b

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Would/will?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    ...
    Both are possible if the sentence is written on the day Ms Adams asked the question.
    But, as 5jj well knows, they mean different things....

    5. Ms Adams wanted to know if Ms Chang would be in class the next/following day.
    Note the change from 'tomorrow' to 'the next/the following day'. '1. Ms. Adams wanted to know if Ms. Chang would be in class tomorrow' works without this change only if the word 'tomorrow' still actually refers to the following day - that is, if the original conversation and the report are separated by no more than a few hours: 'Mrs B. rang while you were out. She wanted to know if you could stand in for her tomorrow.' (5jj said this, but a bit too briefly for it to sink in; I have the attention-span of a fruit-fly - and I imagine some students may have missed this point too.

    b

  8. azhu's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Would/will?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Note the change from 'tomorrow' to 'the next/the following day'. '1. Ms. Adams wanted to know if Ms. Chang would be in class tomorrow' works without this change only if the word 'tomorrow' still actually refers to the following day - that is, if the original conversation and the report are separated by no more than a few hours: 'Mrs B. rang while you were out. She wanted to know in you could stand in for her tomorrow.'

    b
    I...don't quite understand. Aren't "tomorrow" and "the following day" the same meaning?

  9. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Would/will?

    Quote Originally Posted by azhu View Post
    I...don't quite understand. Aren't "tomorrow" and "the following day" the same meaning?
    Hi,

    They refer to the same day. But "tommorow" implies you are speaking from the present, that is "today", while "the following day" means you are talking from the future (two days/weeks/months later). So it is no longer "tomorrow" because you left it behind.

    Greetings,

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  10. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Would/will?

    It depends on both when the speaker is in relation to that day now, and when it was spoken:

    On Monday: Mrs. Adams asks, "Will you be in class tomorrow?"

    Any time after that on Monday, you say "Mrs. Adams wanted to know if I'll be in class tomorrow. I wonder why?"

    On Tuesday morning, you say "Mrs. Adams asked if I would be in class today. I wonder why?"
    On Tuesday evening, you say "Mrs. Adams asked if I would be in class today... now I know why! I got a lovely gift from her!"

    On Wednesday, you say "On Monday, Mrs. Adams asked if I would be in class yesterday. Now I know why."

    On Thursday, you say "Earlier this week, Mrs. Adams asked if I would be in class the following day. That's odd. She knows I'm only there on Fridays."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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