Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 81
    #1

    Expected Grammar Change

    Expected Grammar Change

    What was wrong before sometimes, or often, is correct today.
    "Play the guitar" has already been replaced with "play guitar".
    Subjunctive is being shrinking.

    "He go" is still regarded as wrong or illiterate, which should be "He goes" but there is no telling when "he go" will be accepted and the day might come when people say,"They used to say 'he goes' before..."

    I even heard that in a high school in the US, some students say, "I goed" for "I went".

    Baddest for worst is heard in a movie.

    Lately, I often encounter Present Perfect with a past adverb like:
    "I have already submitted the document two days ago".
    I think this should still be "I submitted ... two days ago" but more and more people, especially those who use English as a second or foreign language, are using Present Perfect with "...ago" or "in 1970" etc.

    Do you think this expressions will be regarded correct some day?

    What else change do you think can be expected in the future English?

    Thank you in advance.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    Quote Originally Posted by KEN JPN View Post
    Subjunctive is being shrinking.

    What else other changes do you think can be expected in the future English?
    It is almost impossible to predict exactly what will happen. I fear that chatlish forms will become increasingly accepted in standard writing.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #3

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    I have never heard "I goed" by anyone older than 3, when that 3-year-old is applying the "ed" rule to an irregular verb without knowing about irregular verbs yet.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,815
    #4

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    I think we'll use fewer prepositions. When impact became popular as a verb a few years ago, it was common to hear on, but now many are using it without the preposition, etc.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 902
    #5

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    There is standard English, in at least two varieties, which is spoken as a native language. Its style has become more telegraphic recently, I think, and its lexicon has continued to evolve, but its grammar has remained reasonably stable in the last half-century.

    There is txt-English. It sounds exactly like standard English in its least formal register, but is written as an abbreviated rebus.

    And then there are the international forms of English adopted by foreign speakers. Here each variety is distinct. Russlish is not Chinglish is not Japlish. (I do not mean these labels in any derogatory manner.) Each variety has its specific lexicon, so for example the Japanese suupaa and pasukon and terebi and hanbaagu would be incomprehensible elsewhere. But also each variety has its grammar. I'll venture to say these are the beginnings of the descendant languages of English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,330
    #6

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    Quote Originally Posted by KEN JPN View Post

    "He go" is still regarded as wrong or illiterate, which should be "He goes" but there is no telling when "he go" will be accepted and the day might come when people say,"They used to say 'he goes' before..."
    NOT A TEACHER



    As you know, the lack of "s" with the third person is often heard in certain types of popular American music. For

    example: "She love me." I cannot discuss this matter further, for it is a very sensitive topic here in the United States.

    2. I think that you will be interested in what a great grammarian * wrote:

    "The east Midland [of England] developed in the fifteenth century a peculiarity of its own -- the suppression of the

    ending in the third person singular indicative: as 'John Dam kno' ... instead of knows."

    This expert tells us that traces "of the east Midland peculiarity are found in our early American documents written by

    people [who emigrated here] from this part of England."

    He adds: "It is still found also in American dialect."

    *****

    *
    George Oliver Curme, A Grammar of the English Language (1931), Vol. I (Parts of Speech), p. 246.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #7

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    Speaking of irregular verbs, there may be an overall tendancy to regularize them. Proved, proven. Dived, dove. I wonder if "catch, catched (instead of "caught") might follow over time.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 02-Jul-2012 at 00:09. Reason: Fixed my typo. Oop!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,814
    #8

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Speaking of irregular verbs, there may be an overall tendancy to regularize them. Proved, proven. Dived, doved. I wonder if "catch, catched (instead of "caught") might follow over time.
    Was that a typo and you meant "dove"?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 81
    #9

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    I always greatly appreciate your correction of my English.
    In daily conversation, usual email exchanging, people do not point out mistakes as long as it is understandable. However, I always welcome corrections, which makes my English better.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 81
    #10

    Re: Expected Grammar Change

    In fact, "goed" for "went" looks natural and logical (?) following the simple rule "add -ed to make a past form". (^^)
    I even wonder why "went, the past form of wend" took place as the past form of GO.... Any clue?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] i`ve been expecting you or i`ve expected you
    By siesta_0425 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21-Apr-2011, 07:01
  2. expected vs had expected
    By Nathan Mckane in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Nov-2010, 10:41
  3. [Idiom] Something not expected?
    By Jeanniezmom in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Aug-2010, 11:41
  4. change in work vs. change in working conditions
    By Eway in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Nov-2006, 10:31
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-Dec-2004, 02:06

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •