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    #1

    delay

    Dear teachers,

    I would like to know if it is possible to use "delay":

    1) to express a period of time (within which one has something to do)

    For example: " I give you a delay of 5 days to send me the document" !

    2) or if it can only be used within the meaning of "lateness"

    For example: " there is a delay in the delivery of the document".


    If only solution 2) is possible, is there another expression for "period of time" in the sentence sub. 1) (it sounds a little awkward to my ears)?

    Thank you in advance!

    Guillaume

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: delay

    Quote Originally Posted by paysage57 View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I would like to know if it is possible to use "delay":

    1) to express a period of time (within which one has something to do)

    For example: " I give you a delay of 5 days to send me the document" !

    2) or if it can only be used within the meaning of "lateness"

    For example: " there is a delay in the delivery of the document".


    If only solution 2) is possible, is there another expression for "period of time" in the sentence sub. 1) (it sounds a little awkward to my ears)?

    Thank you in advance!

    Guillaume
    I would say, "You have to send (me) the document within five days" or "You have five days in which to send (me) the document".

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: delay

    I'd use 'extension' rather than 'delay'.

  3. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: delay

    Hi,

    I've most usually been told about a "deadline" to hand in papers/documents: "The deadline for this paper is next Monday".

    Greetings,

    charliedeut
    Last edited by charliedeut; 03-Jul-2012 at 12:07. Reason: talked away, tols ;-) instead
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: delay

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    I've most usually been talked told about a "deadline" to hand in papers/documents: "The deadline for this paper is next Monday".
    Yes, but this is an extended deadline.
    Last edited by 5jj; 03-Jul-2012 at 12:20. Reason: typo

  5. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: delay

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Yes, but this is an extended deadline.
    You are getting better with the passage of years: now you even manage to correct a typo with another one ! Duly edited
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: delay

    You'll also hear in the context of extending a deadline

    'Your project should have been handed in today, but I'll give you five days' grace.'

    Rover

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    #8

    Re: delay

    I have heard of a "grace period," but not just simply "grace" in this context.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: delay

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I have heard of a "grace period," but not just simply "grace" in this context.
    It's fine in BrE.

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    #10

    Re: delay

    Not just British English.

    "A grace period of five days" = "five days grace" or "five days' grace". In practice you see it both with and without the apostrophe.

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