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    #1

    You're welcome

    I have just read that in the 1960's, people in England usually would not reply "You're welcome" when someone said "Thank you." (They would usually just nod or smile.)

    Is that still the case?

    THANK YOU

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    #2

    Re: You're welcome

    It what context did you read that sweeping generalisation, Parser?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: You're welcome

    I've read it in this very forum more than once. That somehow acknowledging thanks wasn't done with more than a nod and smile, if that.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #4

    Re: You're welcome

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It what context did you read that sweeping generalisation, Parser?
    Thank you, Rover, for your reply.

    1. Mr. William Safire wrote a column about "good" English in each Sunday edition of The New York Times.

    2. His columns were collected into books.

    3. One book is entitled Spread the Word (1999). (See page 6)

    a. He includes a letter from one gentleman.

    (i) This gentleman says that he was an American graduate student (in the U.K.) in the mid-1960s.

    (ii) He says that he found "the average Englishman" more courteous than "the average American."

    (iii) He says that he was "startled to discover that 'you're welcome' was not in their speech."

    (iv) He claims that more "often, one simply received a nod, a smile or just a grunt 'ta' in return."

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