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  1. #1

    should

    Here what is the meaning of should and its function?
    ...Everyone wants to know why you won't listen to me and invite the people you should.

    Also, i have one more questons about the underlined phrase.
    It was bad enough that i had decided to marry a non-korean ,but highly insulting that i wasn't giving everyone the chance to sniker over it in person.
    what does it mean by sniker over it in person and what does it indicate here? Another question, in terms of meaning i think but should be replaced with and . what do you think?

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: should

    Try looking at it this way:

    [1] . . . and invite the people [who/that] you should invite / should be inviting.

    [2] snicker (verb). To utter a partly stifled laugh.

    Laugh about my marriage to my face
    Snicker over it in person.

    [3] but serves as a transition.

  3. #3

    Re: should

    Regarding the expression ..snicker over it in person, can i understand this as the expression that contains negative feeling or attitude about the couple that are about to marry?
    also, about but, i know it is a transition which is usuallly used to contrast the meaning. but here, the two sentences does not contrast in terms of meanig. If it is such case, and is more proper rather than but, doesn't it? what do you think?
    Last edited by bosunyum; 22-Dec-2005 at 10:36.

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #4

    Re: should

    Quote Originally Posted by bosunyum
    Regarding the expression ..snicker over it in person, can I understand this as an expression that contains negative feeling or attitude about the couple that are about to marry?
    It carries a negative meaning; i.e., to laugh in her/his face about her/his choice of husband/wife.

    Quote Originally Posted by bosunyum
    Also, about but, I know it is a transition which is usuallly used to contrast meaning. But here the two sentences do not contrast in terms of meaning. If such is the case, and is more proper than but, Isn't it?
    What do you think?
    Well, let's narrow down the playing field, sort to speak. Which (one) of these definitions works?

    From dictionary.com

    but
    conj.
    1. On the contrary: the plan caused not prosperity but ruin.
    2. Contrary to expectation; yet: She organized her work but accomplished very little. He is tired but happy.
    3. Usage Problem. Used to indicate an exception: No one but she saw the prowler.
    4. With the exception that; except that. Often used with that: would have joined the band but he couldn't spare the time; would have resisted but that they lacked courage.
    5. Informal. Without the result that: It never rains but it pours.
    6. Informal. That. Often used after a negative: There is no doubt but right will prevail.
    7. That... not. Used after a negative or question: There never is a tax law presented but someone will oppose it.
    8. If not; unless: “Ten to one but the police have got them” (Charlotte M. Yonge).
    9. Informal. Than: They had no sooner arrived but they turned around and left.

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