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    #1

    at one's own pace

    Long-distance travel in Britain is also mainly by road, though railways link most towns and cities.
    Most places are linked by motorways or other fast roads and many people prefer to drive at their
    own convenience rather than use a train, even though they may get stuck in a traffic jam.

    The phrase “at their own convenience” in paragraph 4 is closest in meaning to ______.
    A. at the latest time and nearest place
    B. at an appropriate time and place
    C. at an early time and nearby place
    D. at the fastest time and nearest place


    The answer here is B but I don't really get it. The way I understand it, "at one's own convenience" means to be able to do something whenever and wherever he or she wants, which doesn't sound very much like "appropriate".

    If you need further context, refer to question 75 in this exam: http://www.thanhnien.com.vn/pv_obj_c..._dh_12_318.pdf
    And the key can be found here (column 318): http://www.thanhnien.com.vn/pv_obj_c...a1ct_dh_12.pdf

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: at one's own pace

    B is not a good answer; you don't drive at an appropriate time and place.

    However, in this sort of test, you are asked to choose an expression closest in meaning to the original. B is the one that fits that.

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: at one's own pace

    Hello.
    If it were 'pace' instead of 'place', it would work, wouldn't it?
    'at an appropriate time and pace'
    I don't think 'appropriate' fits there either, though.

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    #4

    Re: at one's own pace

    Disclaimer: I am not an English teacher.


    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello.
    If it were 'pace' instead of 'place', it would work, wouldn't it?
    'at an appropriate time and pace'
    Good catch, I say. Let's wait for a native speaker's opinion, but I am almost certain that you're right. (If not, then we both were wrong on this. )



    PS:

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    I don't think 'appropriate' fits there either, though.
    On second thought, neither do I. Still, I got 40 results for "at an appropriate time and pace" (with quotes) by using google.co.uk.
    Dear native English speakers of this forum,
    Please, always point out my grammatical mistakes, assuming you have "the time and the inclination". That is really the most effective way for me to improve. Thank you very much.

    Please note that I am NOT an English teacher.

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