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    #1

    Contention in the classroom.

    I had an argument in my collage classroom today over what the subject of the sentence: "The last person who stole our jagermeister was eaten by marmots." which is it?

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    #2

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    Full subject: The last person who stole our Jagermeister
    Simple subject: person
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    THANKYOU! Why is it that some teachers WILL NOT take any correction from students... -.-

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    #4

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    Um... why is that?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    She (my teacher) insisted that the marmots were the subject and whenever I tried to get her to explain how; she'd use a different example that had nothing to do with what I was talking about.

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    #6

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    When you have a passive sentence, the grammatical subject receives the action. The "do-er" (or agent, or whatever you want to call it) is not the grammatical subject.

    Show her a simpler sentence: My chocolate bar was eaten by my classmate. The grammatical subject is "My chocolate bar." The "do-er" was your classmate, but don't confuse that with the grammatical subject.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #7

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    That was my understanding but what this teacher was saying totally confused that. I kept thinking "how can a marmot eaten something? lol

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    #8

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    Does changing the the sentence from passive to active like: "A marmot ate the last person who stole our jagermeister." make marmot the subject? That's the way I remember it working.

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    #9

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    Exactly. In the active voice, the grammatical subject is "do-er" of the action. In the passive voice, the grammarical subject is the recipient of the action.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #10

    Re: Contention in the classroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dauvit Anthony Tetreau View Post
    Does changing the the sentence from passive to active like: "A marmot ate the last person who stole our jagermeister." make marmot the subject? That's the way I remember it working.
    Yes, it does, but, a Barb said, it does not make it the subject of the passive sentence. The purpose of the passive is to have a different subject and focus from the active.

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