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  1. Keralite's Avatar
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    #1

    Farer than

    Context : I want to ask a person that if the traveling distance to the Dallas is more than Newyork from Cochin.

    Is New York quite farer than Dallas from Cochin by flight?

    Friends , Please help with the correct word that can be used in this sentence instead of ‘farer’

    Thanks

  2. Keralite's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Farer than

    Thank you.

    Yes, I wanted to ask if the distance from Cochin to Dallas is farther than the distance from Cochin to New York.

    You have said it correctly. but I also want to know if the same thing can be said in different way. Friends , your help would be appreciated.


  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Farer than

    No. The word "far" becomes "farther" and "farthest" in comparative forms.

    I don't know why; I expect someone like BobK could tell us.


    But there is no "farer" or "farrer."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Farer than

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    But there is no "farer" or "farrer."
    Completely unrelated to the grammatical question here, but it seems that there is at least one "Farrer" indeed!

    Farrer, Australian Capital Territory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Farer than

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    Completely unrelated to the grammatical question here, but it seems that there is at least one "Farrer" indeed!

    Farrer, Australian Capital Territory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    charliedeut
    I can see two Japanese cars in front of the shop.
    (I'm sorry if I've made the discussion confusing.)

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Farer than

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No. The word "far" becomes "farther" and "farthest" in comparative forms.

    I don't know why; I expect someone like BobK could tell us.


    But there is no "farer" or "farrer."
    Well, not quite... This reminds me of the old joke: 'My family were sea-faring folk'/'And you can't sea farer than that'. So the words 'farer' is a fossil - it turns up in compound words like 'seafarer' and 'wayfarer'; but it's not the comparative of 'far'.

    Your faith is touching, but I can't explain the 'th' off-hand.

    b

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Farer than

    One theory is that 'farther' and 'further' may originally have been comparatives of the early form of 'forth', and may have meant something like 'more forward'. In time, as 'more forward' and 'more far' could often be used in the same context with very similar meaniing, 'forther' became the comparative of 'far'.

  8. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Farer than

    Since I wrote my last post, which was based on memory, confirmed by checking in the OED, I have found these:

    Online Etymology Dictionary
    Online Etymology Dictionary
    Online Etymology Dictionary

  9. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Farer than

    Since I wrote my last post, which was based on memory, confirmed by checking in the OED, I have found these:

    Online Etymology Dictionary
    Online Etymology Dictionary
    Online Etymology Dictionary
    Last edited by 5jj; 13-Jul-2012 at 14:19.

  10. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Farer than

    This was the most informative line in there (for me): "There is no historical basis for the notion that farther is of physical distance and further of degree or quality."

    That's a bit of a relief to me, since I tend to forget about this "rule." So I'm not forgetful, I'm just more aware of the etymology. Or so I can claim!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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