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    #1

    What does "respectfully" mean here?

    As a student you may rescpectfully ask a well-known author to autograph his book that you've bought for you, but how can you say that the great writer RESPECTFULLY signs his name for you?



    Context:

    JANE EYRE
    AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY
    BY
    CHARLOTTE BRONTĖ

    This Work
    IS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED
    BY
    THE AUTHOR

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What does "respectfully" mean here?

    People worthy of respect are often respectful. I don't see the problem

    b

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    #3

    Re: What does "respectfully" mean here?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    People worthy of respect are often respectful. I don't see the problem

    b

    The student is just a nobody, and the great writer as usual respectfully satisfies the request of autograph for the student?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What does "respectfully" mean here?

    You do not say "Would you respectfully sign your book for me?"

    However, gracious authors, who appreciate that their success depends entirely on the public and their liking the author's work, and especially those living in an era of a much greater level of courtesty all around, might well "respectfully" sign.

    And nobody is a "nobody." Every person deserves respectful attention, unless their actions have already proven themselves unworthy. Haven't the fairy tales taught us that? All those archtypes about the old, poor beggar woman who turns out to be a powerful goddess or witch?
    Last edited by Barb_D; 12-Jul-2012 at 16:49.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: What does "respectfully" mean here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    You do not say "Would you respectfully sign your book for me?"

    However, gracious authors, who appreciate that their success depends entirely on the public and their liking the author's work, and especially those living in an era of a much greater level of courtesty all around, might well "respectfully" sign.

    And nobody is a "nobody." Every person deserves respectful attention, unless their actions have already proven themselves unworthy. Haven't the fairy tales taught us that? All those archetypes about the old, poor beggar woman who turns out to be a powerful goddess or witch?
    Barb!
    Using a cellphone or something?
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 12-Jul-2012 at 16:51.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What does "respectfully" mean here?

    Yes, and the screen to see your response is very small. The "An" should be "And."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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