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    #1

    thick

    Our teacher explains the rule this way:
    "When a word has got one syllable and it ends in short vowel + consonant, when we want to make comparatives or superlatives, we repeat the last letter and then add er or est. For example: big: bigger and thin: thinner
    Is that right?
    But I have a problem with "thick". The comparative form is "thicker" not "thickker". How do you explain it?

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: thick

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    But I have a problem with "thick". The comparative form is "thicker" not "thickker". How do you explain it?
    Hi,

    I'm not 100% sure, but it might have to do with the fact that 'ck' represent one single sound:/k/.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: thick

    When a word has one syllable and it ends in short vowel + a single consonant, when we want to make comparatives or superlatives, we repeat the last letter and then add er or est. For example: big: bigger and thin: thinner, long/longer, thick/thicker, grand/grander ...

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    #4

    Re: thick

    Thanks 5jj. Can you please give me some other examples like "thick"? I can't think of anything else.

  3. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: thick

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Thanks 5jj. Can you please give me some other examples like "thick"? I can't think of anything else.
    Slick, for one
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: thick

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Thanks 5jj. Can you please give me some other examples like "thick"? I can't think of anything else.
    Just extrapolate from those examples:
    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    When a word has one syllable and it ends in short vowel + a single consonant, when we want to make comparatives or superlatives, we repeat the last letter and then add er or est. For example: big: bigger and thin: thinner, long/longer, thick/thicker, grand/grander ...
    long /~er => can't think of other adjectives ending '~ng' - but I'm sure someone can
    thick /~er => slack ~/er [in the sense 'more slack'; there is a noun 'slacker'], etc
    grand /~er => fond ~/er, blind~ /er [in the sense 'more blind'; there is a noun 'blinder'], etc

    There are other consonant clusters, often with the first letter n (pink /~er, dank ~/er... etc), l (mild ~/er , bold ~/er, wild ~/er ...etc), or r (hard ~/er, weird ~/er, dark ~/er ... etc)

    b

    PS There are other cases where that 'single' is important; for example when there's a double letter at the end of an adjective (e.g. full, ~/er)
    Last edited by BobK; 11-Jul-2012 at 11:47. Reason: Added PS

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