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    #1

    bring vs took

    When I viisited my grandmother in hospital, I brought/took her some biscuits in case she was hungry.

    Which verb should I use? Thanks.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 12-Jul-2012 at 06:44.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bring vs took

    Bring vs take
    Brought vs took

    It depends if you see yourself in your mind's eye at the hospital. If you do, then "to bring" is okay.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: bring vs took

    See also these previous threads on the same subject.

    I found this page by typing bring/take in the Google custom search box at the top of the page.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: bring vs took

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Bring vs take

    It depends if you see yourself in your mind's eye at the hospital. If you do, then "to bring" is okay.
    Thanks, Barb.

    Can I conclude that if I am in the hospital, I have to use 'bring'? If I am leaving my house with the biscuits, then I have to say "When I visited my grandmother, I took her some biscuits in case she was hungry.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: bring vs took

    No, it's not where you are physically as you say it. It's where you THINK of yourself when you say it.

    If it's three hours later and you're at a cafe with a friend, but you are picturing yourself with your grandmother at the hospital, you will naturally say "bring." But if you are picturing yourself packing up the biscuits at home, you will naturally say "take."

    By the way, I emphasized the bring/take and brought/took because I believe if the thread title had been Bring versus Take, you would have gotten the "similar threads" referenced above. That's one reason good titles are important - they may help cut your time for a good answer down by providing links to prior discussions.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: bring vs took

    It may help to think of 'bring' going with 'come' and 'take' going with 'go'.

    Example:
    (I live in Edinburgh. My grandmother lives in Leeds.)
    'Whenever I go to see my grandmother, I take...'
    (While I'm there, someone asks what's in the bag I'm holding.)
    'Whenever I come to see my grandmother, I bring...'

    b

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: bring vs took

    It may help to think of 'bring' going with 'come' and 'take' going with 'go'.

    Example:
    (I live in Edinburgh. My grandmother lives in Leeds.)
    'Whenever I go to see my grandmother, I take...'
    (While I'm there, someone asks what's in the bag I'm holding.)
    'Whenever I come to see my grandmother, I bring...'

    b

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    #8

    Re: bring vs took

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It may help to think of 'bring' going with 'come' and 'take' going with 'go'.

    Example:
    (I live in Edinburgh. My grandmother lives in Leeds.)
    'Whenever I go to see my grandmother, I take...'
    (While I'm there, someone asks what's in the bag I'm holding.)
    'Whenever I come to see my grandmother, I bring...'

    b
    Thanks, Bob.

    'Whenever I go to see my grandmother, I take

    Based on the above sentence, it seems to me that I should use 'took' in my sentence below.

    When I visited my grandmother in hospital, I took her some biscuits in case she was hungry.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 13-Jul-2012 at 07:08. Reason: remove extra "i" from 'visited'

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    #9

    Re: bring vs took

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    'Whenever I go to see my grandmother, I take

    Based on the above sentence, it seems to me that I should use 'took' in my sentence below.

    When I viisited my grandmother in hospital, I took her some biscuits in case she was hungry.
    When you use the word 'go', I would agree that 'take' is probably more likely, but your viewpoint can change mid sentence. In the first part you are going to see her, and in the second part you are in the hospital bringing the biscuits. As Barb said in post #5, "It's where you THINK of yourself when you say it".

    In your sentence, above, both verbs are possible.

    I think you are hoping that someone will come up with an absolute rule. There isn't one. If you follow the ideas you have suggested so far, you will probably always produce acceptable sentences. However, some people may choose the other verb and still produce acceptable sentences.

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