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  1. HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Apr 2005
    • Posts: 449
    #1

    Nose out into the lane / ease around

    My last crash was caused by my trying to ease around a car which was nosing out into the lane and I didn't have the control to maneuver around it.
    Hi, I am wondering if there is enough information in this sentence to figure out exactly how the car was moving and why this person (the writer was on his bicycle) felt the need of maneuvering around it. Was the car changing lanes? What exactly does 'ease around' mean? to go around? why 'ease' around?


    By the time I got to the corner opposite Junior High, one of the buses was gunning its engine frantically, trying to get some momentum and, at the same time, trying to ease around Mrs. Baker's very, very slowly moving car.
    This is a sentence taken out of the book The Wednesday Wars. This particular scene takes place in winter, and the road is quite slippery because it has frozen over. When the sentence says the bus was trying to "ease around" Mrs. Baker's slowly moving car, does it mean the bus was trying to overtake Mrs. Baker's car? what exactly does 'ease around' mean here?

    Thank you.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,624
    #2

    Re: Nose out into the lane / ease around

    Quote Originally Posted by HaraKiriBlade View Post
    Hi, I am wondering if there is enough information in this sentence to figure out exactly how the car was moving and why this person (the writer was on his bicycle) felt the need of manoeuvring around it. Was the car changing lanes? What exactly does 'ease around' mean? to go around? why 'ease' around? The car was coming out of a road or driveway into the lane, the cyclist was trying to move around the car cautiously.



    This is a sentence taken out of the book The Wednesday Wars. This particular scene takes place in winter, and the road is quite slippery because it has frozen over. When the sentence says the bus was trying to "ease around" Mrs. Baker's slowly moving car, does it mean the bus was trying to overtake Mrs. Baker's car? what exactly does 'ease around' mean here? The bus driver was trying, cautiously, to over-take Mrs Baker's car.

    Thank you.
    Bhai.

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