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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    test or exam?

    Someone replaced this with "passing a bravery exam" and I think "passing a bravery test" can work as "test" is a broader concept than "exam", which may mean only written or formal ones done in class rooms. What do you think?

    ex)...On the South Pacific island of Pentecost, teenage boys must prove they are adults by passing a test of bravery...

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: test or exam?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Someone replaced this with "passing a bravery exam" and I think "passing a bravery test" can work as "test" is a broader concept than "exam", which may mean only written or formal ones done in class rooms. What do you think?

    ex)...On the South Pacific island of Pentecost, teenage boys must prove they are adults by passing a test of bravery...
    "Exam" is not appropriate in that context.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: test or exam?

    Is it because of the reason I said?

  4. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: test or exam?

    NOT A TEACHER

    A "test" can indeed mean more things than an "exam". Compare:

    test - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

    and

    exam - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

    For example, you can say

    The marathon is a test of endurance

    but you can't say

    The marathon is an exam of endurance.

  5. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: test or exam?

    Hello.
    I agree with bhaisahab and Chicken Sandwich. (And of course you do, I believe.)
    It's true "exam(ination)" and "test" share overlapping usages, but the "test" used in your context cannot be replaced with "exam(ination)", which is usually performed for educational, scientific (medical) or legal purposes. Please see: Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary (definition #4 fits in this context.)
    As for your idea that "test" has a broader concept than "exam", I think I can agree with you.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: test or exam?

    Also, regarding word order, the original piece you quoted says "a test of bravery". That word order is much more natural than "a bravery test".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. keannu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: test or exam?

    I've always wondered why, in English, structures such as "a test of bravery" and "the day of victory" are more natural than "a bravery test" and "the victory day". I've seen both forms and many Asian languages have more of the latter form, so I unconsciously try to choose and say the latter form as we have no "of".

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: test or exam?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I've always wondered why, in English, structures such as "a test of bravery" and "the day of victory" are more natural than "a bravery test" and "the victory day". I've seen both forms and many Asian languages have more of the latter form, so I unconsciously try to choose and say the latter form as we have no "of".
    I think the only reason that, for example, "a test of bravery" sounds more natural is simply that, in the context, the "test" here is more like "an ordeal to test XXX" or "a trial". If it actually meant a "test" like an "exam" then it would sound better after the subject.

    He underwent a great test of [his] strength.
    Teenagers endure a test of [their] bravery.
    That film was a real test of my patience.

    He took an English test.
    The schoolchildren must sit several maths tests.
    I watched that film for my Media Studies test.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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