Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 1,271
    #1

    mild arch

    Please set me clear on the following in red.

    His dress is casual; his eyes are not. They are blue and deep set, and when coupled to the slash of gray running through his right eyebrow and the mild arch to his left, he has the appearance of a modern-day wizard.....

    Does "arch" here refer to his left eyebrow that looks like an arch?

    Thank you.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #2

    Re: mild arch

    Yes.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #3

    Re: mild arch

    Hi,
    Biografia de José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. His is NOT a mild arch at all.

    charliedeut

    PS: I did not post the link with any political purposes. It just came to my mind as a counter-illustration of "mild arch". Mr. Rodriguez Zapatero is the Former President of Spain (2044-2011).
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #4

    Re: mild arch

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    Former President of Spain .

    NOT A TEACHER




    Hello, Charliedeut:

    May I have permission to gently call your attention to something?

    Here in the United States, Mr. Zapatero's Spanish title ("el presidente") would be translated as "prime minister" or

    "premier."

    If you were speaking with an educated American and referred to "President Zapatero," s/he might look at you and

    say, "Oh! I thought that Spain had a king."

    HAVE A NICE DAY!

  3. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #5

    Re: mild arch

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER




    Hello, Charliedeut:

    May I have permission to gently call your attention to something?

    Here in the United States, Mr. Zapatero's Spanish title ("el presidente") would be translated as "prime minister" or

    "premier."

    If you were speaking with an educated American and referred to "President Zapatero," s/he might look at you and

    say, "Oh! I thought that Spain had a king."

    HAVE A NICE DAY!
    Hi,

    Indeed, Spain has a King as Head of the State. But Mr. Rodríguez Zapatero was (as is now Mr. Rajoy), the President (Head of the Government).

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #6

    Re: mild arch

    NOT A TEACHER


    Thank you for your kind note.

    I apologize for not being clearer.

    I wanted to gently point out that when you refer to Sr. Rajoy for American audiences, you should always translate the

    Spanish "presidente" as "prime minister" or "premier." Never as "president."

    For Americans, the word "president" refers to the head of state. The head of government is always referred to as the prime minister or premier. Of course, here in the United States, the "president" is both the head of state and the head of government.

    HAVE A NICE DAY!

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #7

    Re: mild arch

    Oh, I see. I did not get you point entirely. Thanks.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #8

    Re: mild arch

    As this thread has now veered ridiculously away from understanding whether an eyebrow can have an arch, I think we can consider it closed.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. mild
    By Tinkerbell in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Sep-2010, 12:52
  2. smooth-carved arch
    By Bushwhacker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Nov-2009, 20:38
  3. tickles,arch-enemies''
    By twilit1988 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Feb-2009, 16:58
  4. mild admiration
    By PINKGREAT in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Oct-2007, 03:53
  5. over-arch?
    By Eway in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2006, 08:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •