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    #1

    Smile Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    Hi dear Friends,
    What's up?

    I have another line in here:

    Mr. Knightley, a sensible man about seven or eight-and-thirty, was not only a very old and intimate friend of the family, but particularly connected with it, as the elder brother of Isabella's husband. He lived about a mile from Highbury, was a frequent visitor, and always welcome, and at this time more welcome than usual, as coming directly from their mutual connexions in London. He had returned to a late dinner, after some days' absence, and now walked up to Hartfield to say that all were well in Brunswick Square. It was a happy circumstance, and animated Mr. Woodhouse for some time. Mr. Knightley had a cheerful manner, which always did him good; and his many inquiries after "poor Isabella" and her children were answered most satisfactorily.

    I think "mutual connexions in Londan" means "Isabella" who is daughter of Mr.Woodhouse and her marriage to the brother of Mr.Knightley. That make a connection as a relative.
    But I am not sure about "Late dinner" and the whole sentence of "He had returned to a late dinner ...".


    Please give me a translation or simplified version of the underlined sentences.
    Thanks.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    He had been visiting Isabella and her family immediately before his return to the area.
    I assume he arrived late in the evening.
    I assume that Isabella lives in Brunswick Square, where everything related to their home and family is fine.
    Mr. Woodhouse wishes Isabella still was with them, and assumes that Isabella wishes the same thing, therefore "poor Isabella" (who is in fact quite happy in her marriage and children) must be suffering because she is not with them.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    Thank you for the reply, Barb_D.
    In my opinion the sentence " Mr. Knightley had a cheerful manner, which always did him good; and his many inquiries after "poor Isabella" and her children were answered most satisfactorily." means something else.
    First of all "his" refer to Mr.Knightley. Am I right? for the sentence "It was a happy circumstance, and animated Mr. Woodhouse for some time." I am confused a lot. What does "it" refer to? Does it refer to the news about all were well in Brunswick Square???

    Please give me some more helps Friends. Thanks again and again


  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver_Twist View Post
    In my opinion the sentence " Mr. Knightley had a cheerful manner, which always did him good; and his many inquiries after "poor Isabella" and her children were answered most satisfactorily." means something else.
    First of all "his" refer to Mr.Knightley. Am I right?
    No. It was Mr Woodhouse who was asking about Isabella, as Barb suggested. It was Mr Knightley who answered most satisfactorily.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    "It" refers to the entire visit by Mr. Knightley.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    Thank you so much!!!!!!!!!

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    And 'their mutual connexions in London' included Isabella, along with everybody else they all knew there. (You may have noticed - perhaps it was in another Austen passage you've quoted - that she spells this as two words - 'every body'. This was the accepted spelling at the time.)

    b

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    I'm wondering if "connexions" was an accepted spelling at the time, instead of "connections".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Emma By Jane Austen - Another Question From Chapter One

    It still is - I think you'll find it in many dictionaries. But not many people use it any more. And I imagine most (if not all) students of English would prefer the T spelling, having learnt 'connect' first.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 15-Jul-2012 at 16:14. Reason: fix typo

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