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    #1

    Red face substituting another teacher's lesson

    I learnt that when a DJ is substituting another DJ, a natural and informal way of saying it is

    sitting in for somebody, right?

    What about teachers? We can's say sit in for another person.

    Can we say: taking over somebody's class? [it sounds like as if I'm going to take over their class from now on]

    I want to say that I'm just substituting one lesson.

    Thanks

  1. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: substituting another teacher's lesson

    (Not a Teacher)

    You could say:

    "I'm taking over for Mr./Ms. Such and Such today."
    "I'm taking over Mr./Ms. Such and Such's class for today."
    "I'm sitting in for Mr./Ms. Such and Such today."

    Please replace "Such and Such" with the teacher's actual name.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: substituting another teacher's lesson

    I would use "sitting in for" for a short-term arrangement (perhaps for one class), and "taking over for" for a longer term arrangement (one week, one term).

    In the UK, we have "substitute teachers" who cover for absent teachers.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: substituting another teacher's lesson

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would use "sitting in for" for a short-term arrangement (perhaps for one class), and "taking over for" for a longer term arrangement (one week, one term).

    In the UK, we have "substitute teachers" who cover for absent teachers.
    I would say exactly the same thing.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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