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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    compounding the problem

    What is the subject for "compounding'? The whole previous sentence or "Future readers"? I lean toward "future readers".

    330-55
    ex)...But as all information becomes digitalized and democratized, and is made universally and permanently available, the media of record becomes an Internet on which misinformation never goes away...It's impossible to stop the spread of misinformation, let alone identify its source. Future readers often inherit and repeat this misinformation, compounding the problem, creating a collective memory that is deeply flawed.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: compounding the problem

    Future readers compound the problem because/when/if they receive and repeat the misinformation.

    So yes, you were right.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: compounding the problem

    I disagree. It is the inherititing and repeating the misinformation that compounds the problem.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: compounding the problem

    Thanks a lot! You mean " inherititing and repeating the misinformation" compounds the problem? What about the whole sentence of "Future readers often inherit and repeat this misinformation"? You once said that a whole sentence can also be a subject of a participial phrase, which is common. And can interpretations be multiple depending on readers' perspectives?
    What about "creating"'s subject? After I came to know the subject for participial phrase can differ case by case, I got into chaos.

    ex)Future readers often inherit and repeat this misinformation, compounding the problem, creating a collective memory that is deeply flawed.
    Last edited by keannu; 15-Jul-2012 at 04:04.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: compounding the problem

    It's the same thing.

    I open my brother's mail, which annoys him.

    The "which" refers to my opening his mail, the same thing as "I open his mail."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: compounding the problem

    Okay, "I open my brother's mail, which annoys him. " can mean both.
    What if "I open my brother's mail, annoying him."? It could mean "I open my brother's mail, and as a result(thus) I annoy him". I think "I" also can be a subject of "annoying". I feel your interpretation is a lot more logical considering the whole context, but I'm confused about grammar books' designating sentence subjects as participial phrases' subject.

  7. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: compounding the problem

    Does it interfere with your meaning? I never understand this quest to label everything.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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