Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 488
    #1

    nervous

    Can we use "nervous" with "with" and say, e.g. Whenever my children don't study, I get nervous with my children, as in I'm happy / angry with my children?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,094
    #2

    Re: nervous

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Can we use "nervous" with "with" and say, e.g. Whenever my children don't study, I get nervous with my children them, as in I'm happy / angry with my children?
    It doesn't sound right to me. Note, you wouldn't repeat "my children".

    "Whenever my children don't study, I worry about their futures."


  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #3

    Re: nervous

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Can we use "nervous" with "with" and say, e.g. Whenever my children don't study, I get nervous with my children, as in I'm happy / angry with my children?
    It's not natural English to use "nervous" in that way. You could say "I get annoyed with my children when they don't study".

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: nervous

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Can we use "nervous" with "with" and say, e.g. Whenever my children don't study, I get nervous with my children, as in I'm happy / angry with my children?
    No. Many European languages have a word similar in appearance to 'nervous' meaning 'on edge', 'tense', 'jittery', 'neurotic. In English, the word means this.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 488
    #5

    Re: nervous

    Thanks very much.
    But a general question, can we use "nervous" and "with" together? I mean can "with" be a preposition for "nervous" in any context? If yes, could you please give an example?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: nervous

    You can say, "I was nervous with excitement/anticipation/etc", but it's more usual to say "The anticipation made me (feel) nervous".

    It's also possible to say, "I was very nervous with my first baby - I always felt I was about to drop her".

    Note that the meaning in both cases is "anxious/worried".

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,094
    #7

    Re: nervous

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Thanks very much.
    But a general question, can we use "nervous" and "with" together? I mean can "with" be a preposition for "nervous" in any context? If yes, could you please give an example?
    You asked it as a general question, with an example. (Good work). And you've been answered generally, using the example you gave.
    In short, no.

    PS: I note 5jj's reply, which I agree with. I had thought of "I get nervous with my mother-in-law staying over." But this means "I get nervous when my mother-in-law stays over. That is, it's not really a "nervous with" collocation. I think the "first baby" example is of this type.
    Last edited by Raymott; 23-Jul-2012 at 09:37.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: nervous

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You asked it as a general question, with an example. (Good work). And you've been answered generally, using the example you gave.
    In short, no.
    I have given a couple of examples in which it's possible but, in general terms, I agree with Raymott's response.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Nov 2011
    • Posts: 488
    #9

    Re: nervous

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    You can say, "I was nervous with excitement/anticipation/etc", but it's more usual to say "The anticipation made me (feel) nervous".

    It's also possible to say, "I was very nervous with my first baby - I always felt I was about to drop her".

    Note that the meaning in both cases is "anxious/worried".
    Just another point, I think it's possible and correct to replace "with" in your example about the baby with "about", isn't it? Does it make sense?

Similar Threads

  1. Nervous about Tesol
    By its_vix in forum Teacher Training
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2010, 23:22
  2. nervous
    By peter123 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-May-2009, 04:54
  3. [Grammar] Etymology of NERVOUS
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 15-May-2009, 17:46
  4. the atmosphere became tense/nervous
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-Apr-2008, 20:35
  5. Why I am always nervous when speaking English?
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-Jan-2006, 08:38

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •