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    #1

    "and" and "if"

    I had thought that "and" and "if" are a pair of words that can be used to express the same idea. For example,
    we can say: 1. Lower your overhead, and your profits will increase.
    or we can also say: 2. If you lower your overhead, your profits will increase.
    But recently, I read from a book that the first sentence is not correct to express such kind of condition.
    I'm confused. Isn't there a proverb that "Give him an inch and he will take a mile", which can be interpreted as "If you give him an inch, he will take a mile"?
    I'm looking forward to your help.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "and" and "if"

    'Not correct' should be 'incomplete': '1. Lower your overhead, and your profits will increase as a result'. There's nothing wrong with the sentence that your book calls 'not correct'; it just doesn't have the same meaning. What happens after something is not always a result. This sort of mistake is at the base of, for example, the Cargo Cults.

    b

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "and" and "if"

    Quote Originally Posted by chance22 View Post
    I had thought that "and" and "if" are a pair of words that can be used to express the same idea. For example,
    we can say: 1. Lower your overhead, and your profits will increase.
    or we can also say: 2. If you lower your overhead, your profits will increase.
    But recently, I read from a book that the first sentence is not correct to express such kind of condition.
    I'm confused. Isn't there a proverb that "Give him an inch and he will take a mile", which can be interpreted as "If you give him an inch, he will take a mile"?
    I'm looking forward to your help.
    The book may be wrong depending on what it actually said.
    It's quite legitimate to express causation in this way, as long as causation is obviously implied. However, you can't just join any two clauses of this type with 'and' and expect the sentence to imply causation.
    "Give me $40 and I'll mow your lawn." / "If you give me $40 dollars, I'll mow your lawn." This is not causation. Me mowing your lawn was not caused by your giving me $40.

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    #4

    Re: "and" and "if"

    Thank BobK and Raymott very much for the explanation.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "and" and "if"

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'Not correct' should be 'incomplete': '1. Lower your overhead, and your profits will increase as a result'. There's nothing wrong with the sentence that your book calls 'not correct'; it just doesn't have the same meaning. What happens after something is not always a result.
    I don't think that such sentences are incomplete without words such as 'as a result'. We may choose to feel that the words are implied, but the fact is they are often not there.

    Certain warnings/threats with and and not Ö.or convey a message very similar in meaning to conditional utterances, though they are not in themselves conditional constructions. It seems to me that what happens after the something in such sentences is a result
    .

    If
    you come home so late home again, Iíll ground you for a month.
    Come home so late home again and Iíll ground you for a month.

    Donít come home so late home again or Iíll ground you for a month.

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