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    #1

    Ifinitives

    I have a quick question that I'd like to ask.In the sentence below is the infinitive "to stop" being used as an object complement.

    The policeman ordered me to stop.

    The policeman = Subject
    ordered = main verb
    me = direct object
    to stop = object complement

    Is this correct?

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Ifinitives

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    If I understand my books correctly, there are two ways to parse your sentence.
    There is no other word that makes more sense for you to use!

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Ifinitives

    I'm confused,see links below:

    Recognize an infinitive phrase when you see one.
    An infinitive phrase will begin with an infinitive [to + simple form of the verb]. It will include objects and/or modifiers. Here are some examples:


    To smash a spider
    To kick the ball past the dazed goalie
    To lick the grease from his shiny fingers despite the disapproving glances of his girlfriend Gloria


    and on another website it says:


    Subject of an Infinitive

    While the word subject in grammar normally applies to a sentence, it is possible for an infinitive to have a subject.
    When an infinitive or an infinitive phrase follows certain verbs, the action of the infinitive may be done by a different person or thing than the subject of the sentence. This doer of the infinitive's action follows the verb and comes before the infinitive. This is known as the subject of the infinitive.
    Keep in mind that when an infinitive follows a verb, sometimes the word to is dropped from the infinitive.
    A personal pronoun is in the objective case when it is a subject of the infinitive.

    Examples: We wanted Bill to go to the airport.
    Simon helped me to record the data.
    No one saw the prisoner escape.
    Simon helped me record the data.
    (In the last two examples, the word to has been dropped.)




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    #4

    Re: Ifinitives

    OK I don't know if anyone else is interested but I think I may have gotten an answer to my previous question.
    What I said:
    Quick question can an infinitive phrase have a subject?
    Have a look at these examples:
    Sandor wanted to play football.
    Sandor wanted Sandorina to play football with him.

    Response from Yossarian the Grammarian on Youtube
    Only finite verbs have subjects (in traditional grammar). Subjects and verbs can stand alone as small sentences. But no noun can ever combine with an infinitive to make a sentence. "Sandor to play" and "Sandorina to play" are not sentences. Infinitives either act as nouns, adverbs, or adjectives, but never as verbs. In the first example, the infinitive phrase is a noun, the direct object of "wanted". In the second, it's an objective complement.

    Thank you Yossarian,you legend

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