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    #1

    grammar in context

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please tell me if my answers are correct ?

    I/ Put the verbs in brackets in the right tense and form and fill in the blanks with the right word (ONE word).

    Superintendent Spence looked at the table in front of him. There (1) (be) was a wrist-watch with a smashed glass, a small gold lighter with initials on it, a lipstick in a gilt holder, and a pair of heavy steel fire-tongs, the heavy head of which was stained a rusty brown.
    Sergeant Graves looked in and said that Mr Rowley Cloade (2) (wait) was waiting. Spence nodded and the Sergeant showed Rowley (3) in.
    Just as he knew all about Beatrice Lippincott, so the Superintendent knew all about Rowley Cloade. If Rowley (4) (come) came to the police station, it was because Rowley had got something to say and that something would be solid, reliable and unimaginative. It would, in fact, be worth hearing. At the same time, Rowley being a deliberate type of person [what does this mean, please ?], it (5) (take) took HIM (?) some time (6) (say) to say. And you couldn't hurry the Rowley Cloade type. If you did, they became rattled, repeated themselves, and generally took twice (7) as long…
    'Good morning, Mr Cloade. Pleased to see you. Can you throw any light on this problem of (8) mine? The man who (9) (kill) was killed at the Stag.'
    Rather to Spence's surprise, Rowley began with a question. He asked abruptly:
    'Have you identified the fellow?'
    'No,' said Spence slowly. 'I wouldn't say we had. He signed the register Enoch Arden. There's nothing in his possession to show he was Enoch Arden.'
    Rowley frowned.
    'Isn't that – rather odd?'
    It was exceedingly odd, but Superintendent Spence (10) (not propose + discuss) was not supposed to discuss with Rowley Cloade just how odd he thought it was. Instead he said pleasantly: 'Come now, Mr Cloade, I'm the one who asks the questions. You went to see the dead man last night. Why?'
    'You know Beatrice Lippincott, Superintendent? At the Stag.'
    'Yes, of course. And,' said the Superintendent, taking (11) what he hoped would be a short cut, 'I've heard her story. She came to me with it.'
    Rowley looked relieved.
    'Good. I was afraid she (12) (modal + not + want + mix up) might / would not want to mix up with police matter. These people are funny that way sometimes.' The Superintendent nodded. 'Well, then, Beatrice told me what she (13) (overhear) had overheard and it seemed to me – I don't know if it does to you – decidedly fishy. What I mean is – we're, well, we're interested parties.'
    Again the Superintendent nodded. He had taken a keen local interest in Gordon Cloade's death and in common with general local opinion he considered that Gordon's family had been badly treated. He endorsed the common opinion that Mrs Gordon Cloade 'wasn't a lady'.
    'I don't suppose I need explain to you, Superintendent, that if Mrs Gordon's first husband is still alive, it will make a big difference to us as a family. This story (14) of Beatrice's was the first intimation I had that such a state of affairs might exist. I (15) (never + dream) would never have dreamt of such a thing. Thought that she was definitely a widow. And I may say that it shook me up a lot. Took me a bit of time to realize it, as you (16) (modal + say) would say (?).

    Thank you very much for your help and happy new year to you.
    All the best,
    Hela

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    #2

    Re: grammar in context

    4- I'd use 'had come'
    5 deliberate type = in control of himself- with a purpose would take
    10- wasn't proposing
    12- to be mixed up
    16- might?

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: grammar in context

    Thank you very much tdol.

    Best wishes,
    Hela

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