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    #1

    Uproar VS outrage

    Hello,

    What's the difference between an "uproar" and an "outrage"? Both mean anger and complaints over something that is considered unacceptable, right?

    Does "be outraged" simply mean 'angry' or there's more to it?

    Thank you.

    Nawee

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Uproar VS outrage

    Quote Originally Posted by naweewra View Post
    Hello,

    What's the difference between an "uproar" and an "outrage"? Both mean anger and complaints over something that is considered unacceptable, right?

    Does "be outraged" simply mean 'angry' or there's more to it?

    Thank you.

    Nawee
    Have you looked them up in a dictionary?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Uproar VS outrage

    There are over 100 dictionaries here.

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    #4

    Re: Uproar VS outrage

    Yes, I have. I understand them both to mean people being upset about something in a big way. I just don't know which one to use or if I can use them interchangeably (I recretly feel that's a no).

    Just want to check what kind of things are more likely to cause an uproar and not an outrage.

    And I also wanted to check if "outraged" is stronger than angry or not. I thought it was, but the dictionaries I checked don't say anything about the degree of anger. Or maybe it's not about the degree (angry-very angry)??

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Uproar VS outrage

    Quote Originally Posted by naweewra View Post
    And I also wanted to check if "outraged" is stronger than angry or not. I thought it was, but the dictionaries I checked don't say anything about the degree of anger. Or maybe it's not about the degree (angry-very angry)??
    I checked in just three dictionaries:

    Collins: extremely angry; furious
    Cambridge: very angry, shocked or upset
    Macmillan: extremely angry and shocked
    Last edited by 5jj; 27-Jul-2012 at 18:46. Reason: typo

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