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  1. moonlike's Avatar
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    #1

    Can we have negative form after "let"?

    Hi
    Could you say if it's possible to have a negative structure after "let" or not? I mean can we say, the teacher lets the students not be absent more than three sessions (the meaning is bizarre. However, the possibility of a negative structure after let is important for me). It sounds weird to me and I couldn't find it in a reference book.

    Thanks a million.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can we have negative form after "let"?

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    Could you say if it's possible to have a negative structure after "let" or not? I mean can we say, the teacher lets the students not be absent more than three sessions (the meaning is bizarre. However, the possibility of a negative structure after let is important for me). It sounds weird to me and I couldn't find it in a reference book.
    Your sentence would mean that the teacher allows the students to be present (not-absent) for more than three sessions. That is somewhat unlikely. I think you mean, "The teacher doesn't let the students be absent ..."

    A negative after let is not impossible, but we tend to avoid it. "I'll let him stay away/stay at home if that's what he wants" is far more likely than "I'll let him not come if that's what he wants".

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Can we have negative form after "let"?

    I believe it's only common in an imperative sentence. And it tends to have a rather poetic tone.

    "Let me not be over-praised; it was a team effort."
    "Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments." (Shakespeare)
    "Let him not breed in great numbers, for he will make a desert of his home and yours." (Planet of the Apes (1968)

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    #4

    Re: Can we have negative form after "let"?

    A radio commentator here likes to tell listeners "let not your heart be troubled."

    Which is from the King James Bible.

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