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    #1

    your day

    I heard the following conversion at work today.


    A: Joe played very well today.
    B: Yeah, it is his day today. I won't challenge him today to steal his day.


    I am not sure if I heard correctly. But if it makes sense, could you tell me what this conversation means?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: your day

    Quote Originally Posted by aha123 View Post
    I heard the following conversion at work today.


    A: Joe played very well today.
    B: Yeah, it is his day today. I won't challenge him today to steal his day.


    I am not sure if I heard correctly. But if it makes sense, could you tell me what this conversation means?
    Without context it doesn't make any sense to me.

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    #3

    Re: your day

    A: Joe played very well today.
    B: Yeah, it is his day today. I won't challenge him today to steal his day.


    As bhaisahab says, it's difficult to be sure exactly what's meant, but this is how I understand what you've given us.

    Person B is saying that Joe has played well and so this is Joe's day to enjoy ("it's his day today"). Therefore B will not do anything that might overshadow what Joe has done and spoil his enjoyment ("I won't steal his day").
    Without more information we don't know what the "challenge" is, but maybe that's not crucial to understanding the situation in general terms.

    not a teacher

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    #4

    Re: your day

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    A: Joe played very well today.
    B: Yeah, it is his day today. I won't challenge him today to steal his day.


    As bhaisahab says, it's difficult to be sure exactly what's meant, but this is how I understand what you've given us.

    Person B is saying that Joe has played well and so this is Joe's day to enjoy ("it's his day today"). Therefore B will not do anything that might overshadow what Joe has done and spoil his enjoyment ("I won't steal his day").
    Without more information we don't know what the "challenge" is, but maybe that's not crucial to understanding the situation in general terms.

    not a teacher
    Your guess about the context is correct. My question is if ""it's his day today" & "steal his day" are correct expressions in American English

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    #5

    Re: your day

    My question is if ""it's his day today" & "steal his day" are correct expressions in American English

    I feel that both these phrases would be easily understood by native AmEng speakers, in the way that I've described.

    The idiom "to steal his thunder" has a similar meaning of diverting attention away from somebody else's success/achievement, although it usually implies getting in first, acting before the other person rather than afterwards.

    not a teacher

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